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  1. #21
    Plinker

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    Thanks to everyone for the replies. Looks like I will be in the market. Iím in no hurry so I would rather wait for a deal on a complete set up from someone wanting to get out of reloading

  2. #22
    Master spencer rifle's Avatar

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    I load 124 grain JHP for less than 12 cents a round. The stuff on sale is often 115 grain FMJ, and my firearms don't like it as much as 124. And that's JHP for less than FMJ on sale.
    With a turret press I can do 228 rounds per hour. More than twice that with the progressive including reloading the case, bullet and primer feeders.
    Rights are only as secure as the ability to wield sufficient force to defend them. - J. Neil Schulman

    ďThere's nothing wrong with the country a bad recession couldn't fix.Ē - Irving Kristol

    "He's not a tame lion..."

    1 Samuel 13:19

    Psalm 149:6

  3. #23
    Grandmaster gregkl's Avatar

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    Quote Originally Posted by ruger333 View Post
    Thanks to everyone for the replies. Looks like I will be in the market. Iím in no hurry so I would rather wait for a deal on a complete set up from someone wanting to get out of reloading
    That setup that someone up thread told you about that has a phone number is a good deal. Heck, if I had the time, I'd buy it and part it out and make a few bucks. It has everything you need plus some to get started.

    And don't be afraid of a single stage. I have a nice system I developed and since I don't shoot 1000's of rounds every week, I can keep up with my consumption. Plus, a single stage is good to start on as you can create redundancies to be sure you are loading each and every round the way it should be.
    "If things seem under control, you are just not going fast enough"--Mario Andretti

  4. #24
    Master

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    Quote Originally Posted by ruger333 View Post
    What is the average cost per round to load 9mm plated target ammo? With the cost of manufactured target ammo averaging around $10 a box of 50 rounds. Is it worth getting into reloading? I have seen used progressive presses with all the equipment needed to start for around 300 - 500 dollars.
    Is it worth getting into reloading? Yes. The answer to this question is almost always, yes!

    You never save money by reloading, though...that is a fallacy.

    If the amount of money you spend on ammo is a constant, you will shoot more by reloading.

    If the amount of ammo you shoot is a constant, you will spend less by reloading your own ammo.

    Most people who get into reloading shoot the guns they have more often, buy guns in different/weird chamberings, and generally spend a lot more time/money on the shooting sports than they would have if they never got into reloading.

    9mm is the gateway drug of reloading. Same with 223 for loading rifle rounds.

  5. #25
    Sharpshooter

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    9mm & 223 being gateway drugs! Now THAT'S FUNNY!

    I started for calibers I simply couldn't find (mostly 1,800s), or were so much cheaper to load cast bullets.
    A little later it was for consistency, back then there weren't 300 'Super Premium' cartridges on the market.
    Not like I could have afforded them at $1.50 to $3.00 a round, and I could build them for 30Ę to 45Ę a round.

    Ammo is a LOT more consistent than it used to be 40+ years ago, so some of that has gone away, but it's still not cheap by any means.
    Machining, forming & heat treating has come a LONG way, so have production rates that drive price down. Got to love automated manufacturing when it goes CNC!
    A lot less mistakes and a lot more production per hour...

    *IF* you have time to trade, then reloading let's you shoot more on the same money (less cost of reloading equipment).
    On top of that, it's just a super interesting hobby you will be able to do until you die or get Alzheimer's.
    I was reloading when I was in a body cast & back brace, one of the few things I could still do... I called it 'Physical Therapy'.
    And it's time away from TV & internet on cold winter days or rainy days when you are cooped up.

    As for cost, depends on what you load.
    Your 'Savings' will be greater with the expensive ammo that doesn't have surplus on the market.
    Ironically, the more expensive 'Premium' ammo is often better done on the lower cost single or 'Turret' (Tool Head) presses,
    While large volumes of common 'Blasting' ammo is cheaper in on a more expensive self indexing progressive press.
    Not as precise/high quality, but the volume of production is exponentially higher than with a single stage press.
    With common components you can knock out 500-600 an hour without breaking a sweat.

    -------------

    Two tips it usually take years, sometimes decades to learn...

    The 'Latest-Greatest' isn't always easy to work with, and the older 'Standards' are still around simply because they work really well.
    Super hot powder that takes small volumes are easy to screw up and not easy to eyeball that screw up, and they are expensive.
    The older 'Standards' take more powder, but the powder is cheaper so the price evens out, and you can see/sense a screwed up charge.

    The latest bullets or dies might look good, but they might not load easily, which leads to screwed up cartridges (waste costs) and inconsistent cartridges.
    An example is round base or boat tail bullets that insert into cases well, then switching for flat base bullets that like to screw up brass and don't much like bullet feeders...
    I'm going though that now with a batch of .40 call bullets with flat bases, I should have stuck with what was working fine all along, and was cheaper.

    While you 'Like' hollow points, the paper range/practice targets don't know the difference.
    Practice is about your skills and not how much the paper screams when it gets hit.
    No sense in wasting money on 'Super-Duper' hollow points when the paper doesn't know the difference.
    FMJ/round nose are easier to load without damage and go faster when loading, less loading time & money means more trigger time!

  6. #26
    Plinker

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    I have been reading a lot of reviews. I really like the Dillon 550 but adding everything I would want started getting pricey. I might opt for the Lee classic turret. I like the idea of switching calibers easily without having to readjust a lot of stuff or spend a ton of cash to do it.

  7. #27
    Plinker

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    Owner of local gun shop said he gets a few presses from time to time but they usually donít sit around for long. Iím going to run over next week and see what he has.

  8. #28
    JHB
    JHB is online now
    Plinker

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    Quote Originally Posted by ruger333 View Post
    I have been reading a lot of reviews. I really like the Dillon 550 but adding everything I would want started getting pricey. I might opt for the Lee classic turret. I like the idea of switching calibers easily without having to readjust a lot of stuff or spend a ton of cash to do it.
    If you buy dies other than Lee you don't have to readjust the dies every time you Change them. I have RCBS dies that have held a setting for 40 years. Lee lock rings don't hold a set when changed. Lee dies are ok but bye the time you put good lock rings on them the price is the same as the others. There is a lot to the old saying you get what you pay for.

  9. #29
    Marksman

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    Quote Originally Posted by JHB View Post
    If you buy dies other than Lee you don't have to readjust the dies every time you Change them. I have RCBS dies that have held a setting for 40 years. Lee lock rings don't hold a set when changed. Lee dies are ok but bye the time you put good lock rings on them the price is the same as the others. There is a lot to the old saying you get what you pay for.
    I have thought the same. I started out with only RCBS dies b/c I had a Rock Chucker press. When I bought my LCT, I got the 223 dies from Lee. As long as you get a turret for each caliber, you don't have re-adjust the dies. Set them, tighten them down, then just switch turrets.

  10. #30
    JHB
    JHB is online now
    Plinker

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    Quote Originally Posted by pgreene78 View Post
    I have thought the same. I started out with only RCBS dies b/c I had a Rock Chucker press. When I bought my LCT, I got the 223 dies from Lee. As long as you get a turret for each caliber, you don't have re-adjust the dies. Set them, tighten them down, then just switch turrets.
    I agree with you 100% but the op doesn't have a press yet. He has stated he is looking for a deal. What are his chances of finding exactly what he wants. This way he knows the ups and down side of Lee lock rings.

    If he finds a good deal on a breach lock he should know to make good use of that he has to purchase inserts for all his dies but he can use Lee locking rings if he keeps the insert and die together.

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