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  1. #1
    wcd
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    Clean up in Isle 9 lol

    After all the storm damage we purchased a name brand made in the US chipper. well it bit the dust, appears there was a defective batch that went out. TSC promptly returned our purchase price and extended warranty. But now they are unavailable. Initially we opted out of buying one from Harbor Freight. But now looks like we may have to go with one? Just curious if any one has had any experience with their wood chippers?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Plinker

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    Like everything in life u get what u pay for...........

  3. #3
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    My Dad has had Chinese Craftsman chippers, which I assume are made right next to the stuff from HFT, in the sub-10hp size for ages and they do fine for what they are.

    But... Understanding this isn't what you asked, my personal opinion for the small jobs is a burn pit and for the big jobs is to rent a big chipper. His small chipper will run all day to deal with just the brush from cutting down a 20' tree and a big guy will gnaw the whole thing up as fast as you can feed it in there. If you believe you can get your work done by renting a bigger guy once a year for a few years for the same price as owning a small guy amortized over a few years, I'd go that way. Around me a 25hp chipper rents for around $200/half day (a 50hp+ is about $250) and usually a Saturday afternoon rental means returned by 7am Monday morning, since most are closed on Sundays, so you get almost 2 days out of your 4 hour rental if you plan it well and ask nicely.

    I waited far too long to discover the joy that is renting someone else's commercial grade equipment, coming within 9/10s of abusing it while getting my work done 10x faster, and returning it without a care in the world.

    I'll also add I'm biased on this specific topic for 2 reasons: I hate dealing with trees and my Dad's last chipper was stolen. So faster to get it over with and nothing left to steal are both strong advantages for me.

  4. #4
    Grandmaster DoggyDaddy's Avatar

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    Quote Originally Posted by maxwelhse View Post
    My Dad has had Chinese Craftsman chippers, which I assume are made right next to the stuff from HFT, in the sub-10hp size for ages and they do fine for what they are.

    But... Understanding this isn't what you asked, my personal opinion for the small jobs is a burn pit and for the big jobs is to rent a big chipper. His small chipper will run all day to deal with just the brush from cutting down a 20' tree and a big guy will gnaw the whole thing up as fast as you can feed it in there. If you believe you can get your work done by renting a bigger guy once a year for a few years for the same price as owning a small guy amortized over a few years, I'd go that way. Around me a 25hp chipper rents for around $200/half day (a 50hp+ is about $250) and usually a Saturday afternoon rental means returned by 7am Monday morning, since most are closed on Sundays, so you get almost 2 days out of your 4 hour rental if you plan it well and ask nicely.

    I waited far too long to discover the joy that is renting someone else's commercial grade equipment, coming within 9/10s of abusing it while getting my work done 10x faster, and returning it without a care in the world.

    I'll also add I'm biased on this specific topic for 2 reasons: I hate dealing with trees and my Dad's last chipper was stolen. So faster to get it over with and nothing left to steal are both strong advantages for me.
    Some places even promote this, like Sunbelt Rentals. That's what I did when I needed a log splitter. Best $100 I ever spent. Had a big maple taken down and I needed it for every bit of 2 days. Got about 5 ricks of wood out of just the one tree.

  5. #5
    wcd
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    Quote Originally Posted by maxwelhse View Post
    My Dad has had Chinese Craftsman chippers, which I assume are made right next to the stuff from HFT, in the sub-10hp size for ages and they do fine for what they are.

    But... Understanding this isn't what you asked, my personal opinion for the small jobs is a burn pit and for the big jobs is to rent a big chipper. His small chipper will run all day to deal with just the brush from cutting down a 20' tree and a big guy will gnaw the whole thing up as fast as you can feed it in there. If you believe you can get your work done by renting a bigger guy once a year for a few years for the same price as owning a small guy amortized over a few years, I'd go that way. Around me a 25hp chipper rents for around $200/half day (a 50hp+ is about $250) and usually a Saturday afternoon rental means returned by 7am Monday morning, since most are closed on Sundays, so you get almost 2 days out of your 4 hour rental if you plan it well and ask nicely.

    I waited far too long to discover the joy that is renting someone else's commercial grade equipment, coming within 9/10s of abusing it while getting my work done 10x faster, and returning it without a care in the world.

    I'll also add I'm biased on this specific topic for 2 reasons: I hate dealing with trees and my Dad's last chipper was stolen. So faster to get it over with and nothing left to steal are both strong advantages for me.
    Wish we could afford one of the big boys, the name brand one we bought was about 1k so it was not a basement model. The usual cycle is the goats eat the brush, and leave the sticks, which usually get shredded for ground cover, and remaining gets chipped into mulch to go in the garden. So we use it almost year round.

  6. #6
    Grandmaster Kirk Freeman's Avatar

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    What island is this???
    Kirk Freeman, INGO's Dennis Miller of gun culture references

  7. #7
    wcd
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kirk Freeman View Post
    What island is this???

    Well itís our homestead. We raise goats they eat a lot of brush that grows wild leaving a lot of branches. We also had the tornado that came through again more branches. We had purchased the chipper to recycle some of it. Itís really useful to have wood chips in the barn for clean bedding. When we clean it out it goes into the compost pile which goes into the food plot to keep the weeds down. We tend not to wast e much of anything.

  8. #8
    Expert

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    Quote Originally Posted by wcd View Post
    Well itís our homestead. We raise goats they eat a lot of brush that grows wild leaving a lot of branches. We also had the tornado that came through again more branches. We had purchased the chipper to recycle some of it. Itís really useful to have wood chips in the barn for clean bedding. When we clean it out it goes into the compost pile which goes into the food plot to keep the weeds down. We tend not to wast e much of anything.
    FWIW, you may actually like the Craftsman my Dad has. The big chute on it folds down to ground level so you can just rake stuff into it. I've never used that feature so I don't know how well it works. I'm also not sure what kind of branches the goats are leaving behind. I'm imagining more like twigs.

    Anyhow, this is his:

    https://www.sears.com/craftsman-250c...p-07177615000P

  9. #9
    wcd
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    Quote Originally Posted by maxwelhse View Post
    FWIW, you may actually like the Craftsman my Dad has. The big chute on it folds down to ground level so you can just rake stuff into it. I've never used that feature so I don't know how well it works. I'm also not sure what kind of branches the goats are leaving behind. I'm imagining more like twigs.

    Anyhow, this is his:

    https://www.sears.com/craftsman-250c...p-07177615000P

    Thank you. Yes they are usually 1 to 3 inches in diameter. Just thick enough so that they take quite some time to break down. Most times I find them with my ankles, when I go out at night to check on things. I am not a neat freak but still although we are rural I still like to keep things picked up.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by wcd View Post
    Thank you. Yes they are usually 1 to 3 inches in diameter. Just thick enough so that they take quite some time to break down. Most times I find them with my ankles, when I go out at night to check on things. I am not a neat freak but still although we are rural I still like to keep things picked up.
    If they're short length and large diameter (I'd say anything over an inch around and less than a foot long is getting on the bigger side) they like to jump back out of the larger hopper (at least when it's upright) and head straight for your jewels... Not fun!

    You've been warned!


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