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  1. #1
    Plinker dhdoug's Avatar
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    people in power

    prolly bordering on the wrong place for this but the current thread about the AOW/AK/...got the mind to wondering. are the persons at the top of the ATF(i know) appointed or??? do any of them have any say in the way nfa rules are written or how does all that come about? you know..all the little details with AOW,SBR and on and on-there seems to be so much to it when there doesnt need to be..imo. where would one or preferably a few million people even start with trying to have some of those laws and amendments changed or repealed or?? i do realize that a course or two in civics or goverment would possibly help me with this but surely one of you NFAers might chime in. after nfa day i am finding this area of firearms regulations pretty interesting but mostly very dishearting. since this isnt a oc..vs...cc or a glock..vs...1911 thread i am pretty sure response will be low but maybe a point in the right direction? thanks
    "Sorry doesn't put thumbs back on the hand Marge." -H.S.

  2. #2
    Plinker dhdoug's Avatar
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    man..awesome. thats what i thought.
    "Sorry doesn't put thumbs back on the hand Marge." -H.S.

  3. #3
    Grandmaster DeadeyeChrista'sdad's Avatar
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    United States Cabinet

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    United States
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    Politics and government of
    the United States


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    The United States Cabinet (usually referred to as the President's Cabinet or simplified as the Cabinet) is composed of the most senior appointed officers of the executive branch of the federal government of the United States. Its existence dates back to the first American President, George Washington, who appointed a Cabinet of four people (Secretary of State Thomas Jefferson; Secretary of the Treasury Alexander Hamilton; Secretary of War Henry Knox; and Attorney General Edmund Randolph) to advise and assist him in his duties. Cabinet officers are nominated by the President and then presented to the United States Senate for confirmation or rejection by a simple majority. If approved, they are sworn in and begin their duties. Aside from the Attorney General, and previously, the Postmaster General, they all receive the title Secretary. Members of the Cabinet serve at the pleasure of the President, which means the President may remove them at will.
    Contents

    [hide]
    [edit] Constitutional and legal basis

    [edit] Confirmation requirement

    Article Two, Section two of the U.S. Constitution says that the President
    “shall nominate, and by and with the Advice and Consent of the Senate, shall appoint Ambassadors, other public Ministers and Consuls, Judges of the supreme Court, and all other Officers of the United States, whose Appointments are not herein otherwise provided for, and which shall be established by Law: but the Congress may by Law vest the Appointment of such inferior Officers, as they think proper, in the President alone, in the Courts of Law, or in the Heads of Departments.”[edit] Other Constitutional references to the Cabinet

    Article Two of the Federal Constitution provides that the President can require "the Opinion, in writing, of the principal Officer in each of the executive Departments, upon any Subject relating to the Duties of their respective Offices."[1] The Constitution did not then establish the names (or list or limit the number) of Cabinet departments. These details were left to Congress and the President to determine.
    Later, upon the ratification of the 25th Amendment to the Constitution, a provision was created allowing the Vice-President and "a majority of the principal officers" of the executive branch departments to transmit a notice (to the Speaker of the House and the U.S. Senate's President pro tempore) that the President is unfit for office. If the President contests this finding, then the U.S. Congress is directed to settle the matter.
    U.S. Cabinet nominees are chosen from a very large pool of potential candidates. One of the few qualification restrictions is set out in the Ineligibility Clause of Article One of the Federal Constitution: "no person holding any office under the United States, shall be a member of either house during his continuance in office." Accordingly, a sitting member of the U.S. Congress must resign from his/her seat in Congress to accept a Cabinet appointment. This clause also bars any member of Congress from holding an executive office that was created by law during his/her current term in Congress.
    This constitutional separation between the Executive Branch and the Legislative Branche is the very opposite of the British, Canadian, or Australian parliamentary cabinet systems, where the members of the Cabinet are required by long-standing precedents to be sitting members of the legislature.
    [edit] The Cabinet in federal law

    There is no explicit definition of the term "Cabinet" in either the United States Code or the Code of Federal Regulations. However, there are occasional references to "cabinet-level officers" or "secretaries", which when viewed in their context do refer to the heads of the "executive departments" as listed in 5 U.S.C. § 101.
    Under 5 U.S.C. § 3110 Federal officials are prohibited from appointing family members to certain governmental posts, including seats in the Cabinet. Passed in 1967, the law was a response to John F. Kennedy's appointment of his brother Robert F. Kennedy to the office of the Federal Attorney General.
    [edit] Salary

    Main article: Executive Schedule
    Cabinet officials receive an amount of pay determined by Title 5 of the United States Code. According to 5 U.S.C. § 5312, Cabinet level positions qualify for Level I pay, which amounts to $199,700. Some cabinet-level officials, including the Vice-President of the United States and the White House Chief of Staff, have their salaries determined differently.
    [edit] Precedence and succession


    The Cabinet of Barack Obama meeting in the Cabinet Room


    [edit] Order of precedence

    During a meeting of the President's Cabinet, members are seated according to the order of precedence, with higher ranking officers sitting closer to the center of the table. Hence, the President and Vice President sit directly across from each other at the middle of the oval shaped table. Then, the Secretaries of State and Defense are seated directly to the right and left, respectively, of the President and the Secretary of Treasury and the Attorney General sit to right and left, respectively, of the Vice President. This alternation according to rank continues, with Cabinet-rank members (those not heading executive departments, the Vice President excluded) sitting farthest away from the President and Vice President.[citation needed]
    [edit] Line of succession

    The Cabinet is also important in the presidential line of succession, which determines an order in which Cabinet officers succeed to the office of the president following the death or resignation of the president. At the top of the order of succession are the Vice President, Speaker of the House and President pro tempore of the Senate, and Secretary of State. Because of this, it is common practice not to have the entire Cabinet in one location, even for ceremonial occasions like the State of the Union Address, where at least one Cabinet member does not attend. This person is the designated survivor, and he or she is held at a secure, undisclosed location, ready to take over if the President, Vice President, Speaker of the House, President pro tempore of the Senate, Secretary of State and the rest of the Cabinet are killed.[citation needed]
    [edit] Cabinet and Cabinet-level officials


    The Obama Cabinet (2009).


    See also: Confirmations of Barack Obama's Cabinet
    The men and women listed below were nominated by President Barack Obama to form his initial Cabinet and were confirmed by the United States Senate on the date noted. An elected Vice President does not require Senate confirmation, nor do White House staff positions like chief of staff or press secretary.
    Secretary Gates was previously confirmed by the Senate (as President Bush's Secretary of Defense) and therefore did not need to be re-confirmed.

    [edit] Cabinet
    "fascist" simply means the other side is poopy. That's a paraphrase.

  4. #4
    Grandmaster DeadeyeChrista'sdad's Avatar
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    United States Department of Justice

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Jump to: navigation, search
    For the animal rights group, see Justice Department (animal rights). Department of JusticeDepartment overviewFormedJune 22, 1870
    July 1, 1870JurisdictionFederal government of the United StatesHeadquartersRobert F. Kennedy Department of Justice Building
    950 Pennsylvania Avenue NW
    Washington, D.C.
    38°53′35.7″N 77°1′29.9″W / 38.89325°N 77.024972°W / 38.89325; -77.024972Employees112,500+ (2005)Annual budget$46.2 billion (2008)Department executivesEric Holder, Attorney General
    Gary Grindler, Deputy Attorney GeneralWebsitehttp://www.usdoj.gov
    Robert F. Kennedy Department of Justice Building, Washington, D.C.


    The United States Department of Justice (often referred to as the Justice Department or DOJ), is the United States federal executive department responsible for the enforcement of the law and administration of justice, equivalent to the justice or interior ministries of other countries.
    The Department is led by the Attorney General, who is nominated by the President and confirmed by the Senate and is a member of the Cabinet. The current Attorney General is Eric Holder.
    Contents

    [hide]
    [edit] History

    The Attorney General was initially a one-person, part-time job, established by the Judiciary Act of 1789, but this grew with the bureaucracy. At one time the Attorney General gave legal advice to the U.S. Congress as well as the President, but this had stopped by 1819 on account of the workload involved.[citation needed]
    In 1867, the U.S. House Committee on the Judiciary, led by Congressman William Lawrence, conducted an inquiry into the creation of a "law department" headed by the Attorney General and composed of the various department solicitors and United States attorneys. On February 19, 1868, Lawrence introduced a bill in Congress to create the Department of Justice. This first bill was unsuccessful, however, as Lawrence could not devote enough time to ensure its passage owing to his occupation with the impeachment of President Andrew Johnson.[citation needed]
    A second bill was introduced to Congress by Rhode Island Representative Thomas Jenckes on February 25, 1870, and both the Senate and House passed the bill.[citation needed] President Ulysses S. Grant then signed the bill into law on June 22, 1870. The Department of Justice officially began operations on July 1, 1870.[citation needed]
    "Act to Establish the Department of Justice" bill did little to change the Attorney General's responsibilities, and his salary and tenure remained the same.[1] The law did create a new office, that of Solicitor General, to supervise and conduct government litigation in the Supreme Court of the United States.[citation needed]
    With the passage of the Interstate Commerce Act in 1887, the Federal government in the U.S. began to take on some law enforcement responsibilities, with the Department of Justice tasked to carry out these duties.[2]
    In 1884, control of federal prisons was transferred to the new department, from the Department of Interior. New facilities were built, including the penitentiary at Leavenworth in 1895, and a facility for women located in West Virginia, at Alderson was established in 1924.[3]
    By 2008 several current and former assistant U.S. attorneys were known to have engaged in a wide variety of criminal conduct including sexual battery,[4] sexual abuse of children,[5] and failures to make mandatory conflict of interest disclosures.[6] A separate Office of Professional Responsibility (OPR) within the DOJ is responsible for investigating attorney employees of the DOJ who have been accused of misconduct or criminal activity with respect to their professional functions as DOJ attorneys. Former U.S. Attorney General John D. Ashcroft acknowledged challenges facing the Department of Justice:
    In the real world of limited resources, we know that we can only detect, investigate and prosecute a small percentage of those officials who are corrupt.[7]
    I remain convinced that there is no more important area in the fight against corruption than the challenge for us within the law enforcement and justice sectors to keep our own houses clean.[8]
    [edit] Headquarters

    Main article: Robert F. Kennedy Department of Justice Building
    The U.S. Department of Justice building was completed in 1935 from a design by Milton Bennett Medary. Upon Medary's death in 1929, the other partners of his Philadelphia firm Zantzinger, Borie and Medary took over the project. On a lot bordered by Constitution and Pennsylvania Avenues and Ninth and Tenth Streets, Northwest, it holds over one million square feet of space. The sculptor C. Paul Jennewein served as overall design consultant for the entire building, contributing more than 50 separate sculptural elements inside and outside.
    Various efforts, none entirely successful, have been made to determine the meaning of the Latin motto appearing on the Department of Justice seal, Qui Pro Domina Justitia Sequitur. It is not even known exactly when the original version of the DOJ seal itself was adopted, or when the motto first appeared on the seal. The most authoritative opinion of the DOJ suggests that the motto refers to the Attorney General (and thus to the Department of Justice) "who prosecutes on behalf of justice (or the Lady Justice)"
    The building was renamed in honor of former Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy in 2001. It is sometimes referred to as "Main Justice."[9]
    [edit] Organization

    [edit] Leadership offices

    [edit] Divisions

    [edit] Law enforcement agencies

    Several federal law enforcement agencies are administered by the Department of Justice:
    [edit] Offices

    [edit] Other offices and programs

    In March 2003, the United States Immigration and Naturalization Service was abolished and its functions transferred to the United States Department of Homeland Security. The Executive Office for Immigration Review and the Board of Immigration Appeals which review decisions made by government officials under Immigration and Nationality law remain under jurisdiction of the Department of Justice. Similarly the Office of Domestic Preparedness left the Justice Department for the Department of Homeland Security, but only for executive purposes. The Office of Domestic Preparedness is still centralized within the Department of Justice, since its personnel are still officially employed within the Department of Justice.
    In 2003, the Department of Justice created LifeAndLiberty.gov, a website that supported the PATRIOT ACT. It was criticized by government watchdog groups.[10]
    [edit] See also

    Government of the United States portal


    [edit] References

    1. <LI id=cite_note-0>^ "Act to Establish the Department of Justice" <LI id=cite_note-langeluttig-p9-1>^ Langeluttig, Albert (1927). The Department of Justice of the United States. Johns Hopkins Press. pp. 9–14. <LI id=cite_note-langeluttig-p14-2>^ Langeluttig, abby (1927). The Department of Justice of the United States. Johns Hopkins Press. pp. 14–15. <LI id=cite_note-3>^ "CNN finds a real expert on sex scandals: Kendall Coffey". http://miamiherald.typepad.com/changing_channels/2008/03/cnn-finds-a-rea.html. Retrieved April 18, 2008. <LI id=cite_note-4>^ "Federal Prosecutor Arrested In Child Sex Sting". http://www.clickondetroit.com/news/14132485/detail.html. Retrieved April 18, 2008. <LI id=cite_note-5>^ "http://laserhaas.wordpress.com/2008/03/05/doj-efforts-to-cover-up-mnat-perjury-and-fraud-now-receives-national-attention/". http://laserhaas.wordpress.com/2008/03/05/doj-efforts-to-cover-up-mnat-perjury-and-fraud-now-receives-national-attention/. Retrieved April 18, 2008. <LI id=cite_note-6>^ ***Phone Number Hidden*** (See Rules for more info)0628/http://www.state.gov/p/inl/rls/rm/may/3387.htm" target="_blank">"The Second Global Forum on Fighting Corruption – U.S. Attorney General John D. Ashcroft remarks at the U.S. Department of State website". Archived from the original on April 10, 2008. ***Phone Number Hidden*** (See Rules for more info)0628/http://www.state.gov/p/inl/rls/rm/may/3387.htm" target="_blank">http://web.archive.org/web/***Phone Number Hidden*** (See Rules for more info)0628/http://www.state.gov/p/inl/rls/rm/may/3387.htm. Retrieved April 18, 2008. <LI id=cite_note-7>^ "U.S. Attorney General John D. Ashcroft addressing The Hague". http://www.state.gov/p/inl/rls/rm/may/3387.htm. Retrieved April 18, 2008. [dead link] <LI id=cite_note-8>^ Malek, Alia (March 30, 2007). "Partisan Civil Rights: Bush's Long History of Politicizing Justice". Spiegel Online. http://www.spiegel.de/international/0,1518,474911,00.html. Retrieved 2009-07-26.
    2. ^ .gov Watch, October 18, 2007

    [edit] External links

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    "fascist" simply means the other side is poopy. That's a paraphrase.

  5. #5
    Grandmaster DeadeyeChrista'sdad's Avatar
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    United States Department of Justice

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Jump to: navigation, search
    For the animal rights group, see Justice Department (animal rights). Department of JusticeDepartment overviewFormedJune 22, 1870
    July 1, 1870JurisdictionFederal government of the United StatesHeadquartersRobert F. Kennedy Department of Justice Building
    950 Pennsylvania Avenue NW
    Washington, D.C.
    38°53′35.7″N 77°1′29.9″W / 38.89325°N 77.024972°W / 38.89325; -77.024972Employees112,500+ (2005)Annual budget$46.2 billion (2008)Department executivesEric Holder, Attorney General
    Gary Grindler, Deputy Attorney GeneralWebsitehttp://www.usdoj.gov
    Robert F. Kennedy Department of Justice Building, Washington, D.C.


    The United States Department of Justice (often referred to as the Justice Department or DOJ), is the United States federal executive department responsible for the enforcement of the law and administration of justice, equivalent to the justice or interior ministries of other countries.
    The Department is led by the Attorney General, who is nominated by the President and confirmed by the Senate and is a member of the Cabinet. The current Attorney General is Eric Holder.
    Contents

    [hide]
    [edit] History

    The Attorney General was initially a one-person, part-time job, established by the Judiciary Act of 1789, but this grew with the bureaucracy. At one time the Attorney General gave legal advice to the U.S. Congress as well as the President, but this had stopped by 1819 on account of the workload involved.[citation needed]
    In 1867, the U.S. House Committee on the Judiciary, led by Congressman William Lawrence, conducted an inquiry into the creation of a "law department" headed by the Attorney General and composed of the various department solicitors and United States attorneys. On February 19, 1868, Lawrence introduced a bill in Congress to create the Department of Justice. This first bill was unsuccessful, however, as Lawrence could not devote enough time to ensure its passage owing to his occupation with the impeachment of President Andrew Johnson.[citation needed]
    A second bill was introduced to Congress by Rhode Island Representative Thomas Jenckes on February 25, 1870, and both the Senate and House passed the bill.[citation needed] President Ulysses S. Grant then signed the bill into law on June 22, 1870. The Department of Justice officially began operations on July 1, 1870.[citation needed]
    "Act to Establish the Department of Justice" bill did little to change the Attorney General's responsibilities, and his salary and tenure remained the same.[1] The law did create a new office, that of Solicitor General, to supervise and conduct government litigation in the Supreme Court of the United States.[citation needed]
    With the passage of the Interstate Commerce Act in 1887, the Federal government in the U.S. began to take on some law enforcement responsibilities, with the Department of Justice tasked to carry out these duties.[2]
    In 1884, control of federal prisons was transferred to the new department, from the Department of Interior. New facilities were built, including the penitentiary at Leavenworth in 1895, and a facility for women located in West Virginia, at Alderson was established in 1924.[3]
    By 2008 several current and former assistant U.S. attorneys were known to have engaged in a wide variety of criminal conduct including sexual battery,[4] sexual abuse of children,[5] and failures to make mandatory conflict of interest disclosures.[6] A separate Office of Professional Responsibility (OPR) within the DOJ is responsible for investigating attorney employees of the DOJ who have been accused of misconduct or criminal activity with respect to their professional functions as DOJ attorneys. Former U.S. Attorney General John D. Ashcroft acknowledged challenges facing the Department of Justice:
    In the real world of limited resources, we know that we can only detect, investigate and prosecute a small percentage of those officials who are corrupt.[7]
    I remain convinced that there is no more important area in the fight against corruption than the challenge for us within the law enforcement and justice sectors to keep our own houses clean.[8]
    [edit] Headquarters

    Main article: Robert F. Kennedy Department of Justice Building
    The U.S. Department of Justice building was completed in 1935 from a design by Milton Bennett Medary. Upon Medary's death in 1929, the other partners of his Philadelphia firm Zantzinger, Borie and Medary took over the project. On a lot bordered by Constitution and Pennsylvania Avenues and Ninth and Tenth Streets, Northwest, it holds over one million square feet of space. The sculptor C. Paul Jennewein served as overall design consultant for the entire building, contributing more than 50 separate sculptural elements inside and outside.
    Various efforts, none entirely successful, have been made to determine the meaning of the Latin motto appearing on the Department of Justice seal, Qui Pro Domina Justitia Sequitur. It is not even known exactly when the original version of the DOJ seal itself was adopted, or when the motto first appeared on the seal. The most authoritative opinion of the DOJ suggests that the motto refers to the Attorney General (and thus to the Department of Justice) "who prosecutes on behalf of justice (or the Lady Justice)"
    The building was renamed in honor of former Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy in 2001. It is sometimes referred to as "Main Justice."[9]
    [edit] Organization

    [edit] Leadership offices

    [edit] Divisions

    [edit] Law enforcement agencies

    Several federal law enforcement agencies are administered by the Department of Justice:
    [edit] Offices

    [edit] Other offices and programs

    In March 2003, the United States Immigration and Naturalization Service was abolished and its functions transferred to the United States Department of Homeland Security. The Executive Office for Immigration Review and the Board of Immigration Appeals which review decisions made by government officials under Immigration and Nationality law remain under jurisdiction of the Department of Justice. Similarly the Office of Domestic Preparedness left the Justice Department for the Department of Homeland Security, but only for executive purposes. The Office of Domestic Preparedness is still centralized within the Department of Justice, since its personnel are still officially employed within the Department of Justice.
    In 2003, the Department of Justice created LifeAndLiberty.gov, a website that supported the PATRIOT ACT. It was criticized by government watchdog groups.[10]
    [edit] See also

    Government of the United States portal


    [edit] References

    1. <LI id=cite_note-0>^ "Act to Establish the Department of Justice" <LI id=cite_note-langeluttig-p9-1>^ Langeluttig, Albert (1927). The Department of Justice of the United States. Johns Hopkins Press. pp. 9–14. <LI id=cite_note-langeluttig-p14-2>^ Langeluttig, abby (1927). The Department of Justice of the United States. Johns Hopkins Press. pp. 14–15. <LI id=cite_note-3>^ "CNN finds a real expert on sex scandals: Kendall Coffey". http://miamiherald.typepad.com/changing_channels/2008/03/cnn-finds-a-rea.html. Retrieved April 18, 2008. <LI id=cite_note-4>^ "Federal Prosecutor Arrested In Child Sex Sting". http://www.clickondetroit.com/news/14132485/detail.html. Retrieved April 18, 2008. <LI id=cite_note-5>^ "http://laserhaas.wordpress.com/2008/03/05/doj-efforts-to-cover-up-mnat-perjury-and-fraud-now-receives-national-attention/". http://laserhaas.wordpress.com/2008/03/05/doj-efforts-to-cover-up-mnat-perjury-and-fraud-now-receives-national-attention/. Retrieved April 18, 2008. <LI id=cite_note-6>^ ***Phone Number Hidden*** (See Rules for more info)0628/http://www.state.gov/p/inl/rls/rm/may/3387.htm" target="_blank">"The Second Global Forum on Fighting Corruption – U.S. Attorney General John D. Ashcroft remarks at the U.S. Department of State website". Archived from the original on April 10, 2008. ***Phone Number Hidden*** (See Rules for more info)0628/http://www.state.gov/p/inl/rls/rm/may/3387.htm" target="_blank">http://web.archive.org/web/***Phone Number Hidden*** (See Rules for more info)0628/http://www.state.gov/p/inl/rls/rm/may/3387.htm. Retrieved April 18, 2008. <LI id=cite_note-7>^ "U.S. Attorney General John D. Ashcroft addressing The Hague". http://www.state.gov/p/inl/rls/rm/may/3387.htm. Retrieved April 18, 2008. [dead link] <LI id=cite_note-8>^ Malek, Alia (March 30, 2007). "Partisan Civil Rights: Bush's Long History of Politicizing Justice". Spiegel Online. http://www.spiegel.de/international/0,1518,474911,00.html. Retrieved 2009-07-26.
    2. ^ .gov Watch, October 18, 2007

    [edit] External links

    [show]
    v d e
    Agencies under the United States Department of JusticeHeadquarters: Robert F. Kennedy Department of Justice Building
    Attorney GeneralDeputy
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    "fascist" simply means the other side is poopy. That's a paraphrase.

  6. #6

  7. #7
    Grandmaster DeadeyeChrista'sdad's Avatar
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    Long story short, BATFE is a law enforcement arm of the Justice Department, which works for the Attorney General, who is a man named Eric Holder. Mr. Holder works for the president. Who works for you. (at least theoretically.)
    Mr. Holder IS appointed by the president, and confirmed by the senate. Most presidential appointments, with the notable exception of Justices of the Supreme Court, are slam dunks.
    The only problem here is that Mr. Holder is a protoge of a former Attorney General, Janet Wood Reno. Who as we all know is the antichrist.
    Mr. Holder is NOT supportive of your second amendment rights, and dependant upon the outcome of next month's elections, may try to have bills introduced into congress which would negatively affect all of us in regards to our second amendment rights.
    Tomorrow there will be a quiz.
    "fascist" simply means the other side is poopy. That's a paraphrase.

  8. #8
    Plinker dhdoug's Avatar
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    sweet jesus DCsdad............um..uh...i gots some learnin to do. seriously though-THANK YOU for your time and effort. guess next time i have a snide remark cause of no replies...i'll think twice
    "Sorry doesn't put thumbs back on the hand Marge." -H.S.

  9. #9
    Grandmaster DeadeyeChrista'sdad's Avatar
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    "fascist" simply means the other side is poopy. That's a paraphrase.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by DeadeyeChrista'sdad View Post

    somethin tells me you been lookin into this awhile!!!


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