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  1. #1
    Master doddg's Avatar

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    Retirement and gun/ammo/range costs

    My wife and I were talking about retirement Friday and she mentioned that I would have to give up my "hobby" if I retire now instead of keep working for another year or two.
    Income will be stable enough at first, but as anyone who has been through the "retirement counseling" seminars, it is what things cost 7-10 yrs. down the road that are crucial.
    Inflation has not been an issue for the past decade or more but it will come back like with a vengeance since everyone is living on borrowed money, especially on the Government level.
    I believe an economic "crash" is looming (I remember the last 3, but the next one is really going to level things off).
    As I tell my students: not just families go bankrupt from spending more than they bring in, but countries do also.

    I've been keeping the old-style blue Dome budget books for 3 decades and know exactly what my expenses are.
    Some things have doubled in the past 20 yrs.: water and food to illustrate.

    I told her I have already counted the costs and knew the realities, and wasn't going to keep working just to fund a hobby (I'm out of control, but not that much.,) especially one that is less than 2 yrs. old and only indulged in when the house and cars were paid off and no kids (no debt at all).
    I just bought my wife a car and we'd intended to pay it off in 1.5 yrs. Not sure how not having a regular income will affect that since when I bought it I thought I was going to work 2-4 more years.

    Buying a gun w/o selling what I have to pay for it (which I've been trying to do lately anyway) would be over, and I'd have to make some serious decisions about which guns to sell (not keeping two of the same kind of gun: Ruger Mark 4 and S/W 22A-1 or the same type/style of a gun: a dozen semi-auto .22LRs).
    The biggest deal is ammo costs, imo., since not buying another gun stops that expenditure but ammo is ongoing and ongoing and ongoing.
    When I go to the range, I usually put 200-300 rounds downrange. I couldn't go twice a week month after month at that rate when retired (9mm costs: $50/per session; $100/per week; $400/per month; $5200/per year). (.22LR costs would be $1733/yr.)
    I've even thought that if retired I would want to go more often!

    I have even thought I could shorten my range time and shoot 1/2 of the rounds (100-200 rounds) I do now .
    Since many of you have "been there and done that," I thought I'd get some feedback on how you managed after retirement and your money flow was restricted.
    Those of you still living on your spouse's dime during retirement b/c she is still working, need not reply. I do envy you though!

  2. #2
    Grandmaster jagee's Avatar

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    Reload. Buy the setup now while you still have steady income. Then you just need components which are significantly less expensive than ready to shoot ammo.

    There is an up front cost, but if you shoot a lot like it seems you do, eventually you'll come out ahead.
    Quote Originally Posted by KJQ6945 View Post
    Jagee makes Beetlejuice look like a *****!

  3. #3
    Mickey Mantle Trigger Time's Avatar

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    Quote Originally Posted by jagee View Post
    Reload. Buy the setup now while you still have steady income. Then you just need components which are significantly less expensive than ready to shoot ammo.

    There is an up front cost, but if you shoot a lot like it seems you do, eventually you'll come out ahead.
    I was gonna say this lol. But I'm not allowed to comment since I'm living off my wife I guess
    BUYING,1950's & 1960's Gibson Guitars

  4. #4
    Perpetually Peeved Poultry AngryRooster's Avatar

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    Quote Originally Posted by jagee View Post
    Reload. Buy the setup now while you still have steady income. Then you just need components which are significantly less expensive than ready to shoot ammo.

    There is an up front cost, but if you shoot a lot like it seems you do, eventually you'll come out ahead.
    This.

    Also, consolidate calibers. Find powders & primers that can do multiple things. Learn to cast your own bullets, find molds that can do multiple things. The NOE molds are nice. Get together with someone and buy components in bulk.
    Less & less amused every day...
    INGO #467

  5. #5
    Grandmaster

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    Quote Originally Posted by jagee View Post
    Reload. Buy the setup now while you still have steady income. Then you just need components which are significantly less expensive than ready to shoot ammo.

    There is an up front cost, but if you shoot a lot like it seems you do, eventually you'll come out ahead.
    Agreed. I load 4 rifle calibers and 9mm. If I didn't reload the rifle ammo, we couldn't afford to do our prairie dog trips. The wife joined The Well Armed Woman and she burns 9mm almost as fast as I can reload it. She always brings home more brass than she shoots, though. I guess I've got around 5K pieces of it waiting to be loaded. Once you amortize the upfront cost, you're ahead of the curve. And, reloading gives me something to do in my spare and leisure moments. I NEVER buy rimfire ammo locally. You can order it online, by the brick, and it will be cheaper even with shipping charges.
    People who think they know everything are particularly annoying to those of us who do.

  6. #6
    Plinker

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    It seems you are going to get a big pile-on suggesting reloading, as that is my recommendation as well. A good setup can be had for about the same cost as one decent handgun. After that, your shooting costs are about half. If you also started casting bullets it goes way down from there. An excellent side benefit is that reolading is a hobby in itself and does take time... and so you are able to stay involved with shooting hobbies without always shooting. You may find you can get your fill by shooting 3x every 2 weeks, and then 1 afternoon reloading.

    Secondly, primers and powder don't take up much space. You could stack in a 2 to 3 year supply of primers in a banker's box. Close to that with powder. Stock those in now while working and you can shoot for years w/o worrying about shooting costs. Stocking up on bullets is somewhat more problematic... a 10 year supply with your numbers would weigh about 7000 lbs. Not something I want to have to shuffle around!

  7. #7
    Grandmaster halfmileharry's Avatar

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    Quote Originally Posted by Trigger Time View Post
    I was gonna say this lol. But I'm not allowed to comment since I'm living off my wife I guess
    Live long enough to live off dead relatives like I'm doing.
    Ok, I'm retired as well and I took a long look at my retirement budget and Yes, I did up my income with some part time work for my hobbies and/or bad habits.
    I no longer have thoughts of not being able to live in my own form of comfort and happy.
    You probably worked most of your life to enjoy what you like I'm guessing so I'm thinking you'll probably be content on a new endeavor in your life. You have a wife to consider her thoughts as well and I'd look for a way to support your hobby. I'm not being cynical but it sounds as she doesn't look ahead far enough to help you enjoy parts of your life. Maybe you and her can find a way to continue your little gun happy.
    The more you sweat in training the less you bleed in battle.

  8. #8
    I Care...Really
    churchmouse's Avatar

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    Quote Originally Posted by jagee View Post
    Reload. Buy the setup now while you still have steady income. Then you just need components which are significantly less expensive than ready to shoot ammo.

    There is an up front cost, but if you shoot a lot like it seems you do, eventually you'll come out ahead.
    AKA..Thor. Odin son. God of thunder.
    But you can call me John.....Force.

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  9. #9
    I Care...Really
    churchmouse's Avatar

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    OK fellas. Lets look at this. I am about his age. I looked at reloading several times. The initial coasts involved for a decent progressive set up is a bit off putting. Add in all the needed accessory's to make this process as easy as possible (lights/tables/shelve/bits pieces and so on) and the initial investment will never be fully re-couped in the very small savings some people see in 9mm/45ACP. Add in the learning curve and the time required and it just does not add up for folks our age.

    This can be argued I am sure. And might be but the numbers are right there. For me the time factor weighs in heavily. For some this might be a great way to enter retirement.

    I started filling the ammo cabinets just before sandy hook. There were a few set backs due to the media driven frenzy's we have had but I now have enough locked down to keep me rolling for a long long time. There are deals if you watch and are ready. The expense has been spread out over several years.

    Just my opinion.
    AKA..Thor. Odin son. God of thunder.
    But you can call me John.....Force.

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  10. #10
    Grandmaster halfmileharry's Avatar

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    IF I remember...... Doesn't the OP shoot a lot of .22?
    Reloading might be a challenge.
    The more you sweat in training the less you bleed in battle.

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