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  1. #11
    Grandmaster KellyinAvon's Avatar

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    Quote Originally Posted by DoggyDaddy View Post
    Most parents complain because their kids' backpacks are so heavy from having to carry their books home for homework. Wonder how they'd react to hoodies or backpacks with AR-500 plates in them.

    I had to take my books home too when I was a kid. And we didn't even have no stinkin' backpacks! We had to keep that pile of books tucked under our little arms! Not to mention walking to and from school barefoot in the snow... uphill both ways.
    I'm resisting the urge to make a one-room schoolhouse comment here, DD No backpacks in the class of 82 (single A, K-12 one building) or class of 05 (AAA school in Virginia.) Class of 15 at Avon? My youngest destroyed 2 backpacks a year throughout high school. With all the books he carried I think it could've stopped rifle rounds, thankfully never had to find out.
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  2. #12
    Grandmaster Gabriel's Avatar

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    Quote Originally Posted by NKBJ View Post
    Protect their kids? That's easy.
    All they have to do is reject the satanic culture and go back to Christ.
    If they want to stick with rot then rot they got.

    Will they? Not.
    Medium speed. Moderate drag.

  3. #13
    Plinker

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    Quote Originally Posted by Backpacker View Post
    Read the link I provided. The article has a list of specifications.

    I didn't scroll all the way down before.
    The story I saw was on NBC I think and they didn't mention the manufacturer.

  4. #14
    Expert

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    Quote Originally Posted by NKBJ View Post
    Protect their kids? That's easy.
    All they have to do is reject the satanic culture and go back to Christ.
    If they want to stick with rot then rot they got.

    Will they? Not.
    "They"? Who is this ethereal creature? Parents everywhere would love to have a 100% solution, including the parents who already wear denim skirts and Keds. It's not OUR kid's morality or religion in question when the shooting starts.

    ...but Jesus will not help your kid in a school shooting until it's already over and your kid is dead.

    Prayer does not usually stop 5.56x45, though it can't hurt.

    Neither can armor.
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  5. #15
    Expert NKBJ's Avatar

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    It's each individual person making the decision on what they live in; that's what the culture is.

  6. #16
    Expert

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    Quote Originally Posted by NKBJ View Post
    It's each individual person making the decision on what they live in; that's what the culture is.
    Please clarify. I don't understand what you just wrote.
    President's Hundred
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  7. #17
    Marksman

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    What about all this eplaces that forbid wearing 'hoodies'?

  8. #18
    Ark
    Ark is offline
    Expert Ark's Avatar

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    Nobody tell the parents about that study on mass shooting wound dynamics. Junior is either going to get winged on the run and escape with a non-life threatening wound, or he's going to get hammered four or five times to the face and chest with a caliber that ignores soft armor. Fewer than 1-in-10 victims killed in mass shootings died of wounds that were theoretically survivable. There is no armor that protects you from being repeatedly shot in the head while you're hiding or begging for your life on your knees, which is probably how your kid is gonna die if they die in a mass shooting.

    Take that money, spend it on a summer sports program that gets your kid doing a lot of cardio, and then have a simple and realistic conversation when school starts again. But, no, people don't want to do that. People want to throw money away on buying a pleasant fiction that assuages their fears, and there will never be a shortage of people willing to sell them that fiction.

  9. #19
    Marksman Backpacker's Avatar

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ark View Post
    Take that money, spend it on a summer sports program that gets your kid doing a lot of cardio, and then have a simple and realistic conversation when school starts again. But, no, people don't want to do that. People want to throw money away on buying a pleasant fiction that assuages their fears, and there will never be a shortage of people willing to sell them that fiction.
    Exactly!

    We tell our children to look both ways before crossing the street, etc. It is time to teach them situational awareness too.

  10. #20
    Marksman Karl-just-Karl's Avatar

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    NKBJ, I agree with you. Anyone else can send me all the eye rolls that they want.

    Our culture is what it is now. All the blame, finger pointing, hand wringing, weeping, wailing and gnashing of teeth doesn't change where we are at socially or as a culture. We have to deal with what we have.

    Should we choose moral teaching that places personal responsibility and respect for each other at the forefront? Or should we opt for a secular humanist approach where the blanket message is that we should just love and respect each other's differences?

    On the surface there doesn't appear to be much difference. A little deeper look reveals one side that says, do what makes you happy as long as you don't encroach on someone else's pursuit of happiness and the other restricts behavior through self-discipline.

    All I can say is that witnessing what 50 years of the one approach has done to our society and culture should provide ample evidence of what fruit it bears.


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