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  1. #1
    Sharpshooter Bobby's Avatar

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    Things to keep in mind as I work on rifle skills.

    Hello all,
    I have been shooting handguns for the last 12 years. While I am not an expert, I am happy with how that is coming along. My rifle skills, though, are non-existent. I have a Ruger 10/22 that I play around with but today I set up a 8x8 steel target and plan to work on my rifle skills. I find that I can consistently hit the steel target with my Ruger equipped with iron sights at 50 yards but struggle once I go up to 75. What size steel targets should I have use? Smaller than 8x8 or larger? What distances should I work up to with iron sights? What about red dots? What is a good distance with them? I can't stand scopes and anyway I don't have a use for them at the moment as I work on my skills.

    My family has AR15s but I don't care for them for some reason. I had a Crossman BB gun as a kid so the Ruger 10/22 feels like an old friend. I would like to work up to a Ruger Mini 14 and a M1 Garand some day. Those rifles just feel "right" to me compared to the AR15.

    I'll do some reading on the Internet but wanted to throw this post out there if anyone wanted to offer input. Thanks all!

    Bobby

  2. #2
    Grandmaster Kirk Freeman's Avatar

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    You need a class, not Internet advice. There is no substitute.

    The software is to the hardware as 3 is to 1.
    Kirk Freeman, INGO's Dennis Miller of gun culture references

  3. #3
    Expert

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kirk Freeman View Post
    You need a class, not Internet advice. There is no substitute.

    The software is to the hardware as 3 is to 1.
    The internet IS a giant class, in a way.

    OP: start shooting 50 rounds a day at that steel. Every day. When you cannot miss it at a given range, move back 10 yards, and start again. When you get to 100 yards, and you cannot miss it anymore, then get a 4” plate, and start again at 60 yards.

    If you get to where you can hit that plate most all the time at 100 yards, well, ya won’t have to take any **** from anybody on this forum—or any othet one—that’s for sure.
    President's Hundred
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  4. #4
    Grandmaster Tombs's Avatar

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    Quote Originally Posted by natdscott View Post
    The internet IS a giant class, in a way.

    OP: start shooting 50 rounds a day at that steel. Every day. When you cannot miss it at a given range, move back 10 yards, and start again. When you get to 100 yards, and you cannot miss it anymore, then get a 4” plate, and start again at 60 yards.

    If you get to where you can hit that plate most all the time at 100 yards, well, ya won’t have to take any **** from anybody on this forum—or any othet one—that’s for sure.

    If your fundamentals aren't right and you have no real aim to your practice beyond practicing bad habits, that practice is more harm than good.
    Do not interrupt your enemy while they are making a mistake.

  5. #5
    Master Ggreen's Avatar

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    You are starting out with the wrong mindset. The mini is an inferior semi auto across the board. They are poor rifles for building skill because they are not capable of maintaining accuracy and reliability. Flame on, but I've yet to see a mini shoot better than 2moa in person.

    Garands are neat, but mostly irrelevant in practical terms. I wont discount the cool factor and you will learn real skills laying behind one. It's an expensive path.

    Keep working that 1022. Paint your steel white and put a 1x1 piece of tape in the center to give you a group reference.

    And definitely take a Revere's Riders course.

  6. #6
    Expert DadSmith's Avatar

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    Are you shooting from a rest?
    Also what distance did you sight in your 10/22?
    If you sighted it in at 25 yards it will drop around 4-5" at 75 yard and around 10" at 100. This depends on the ammunition and range you have it shot in at. I'm just trying to give you a general overview. You might be aiming to low at 75 yards.
    Greater love hath no man than this, that a man lay down his life for his friends.

  7. #7
    Master Twangbanger's Avatar

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bobby View Post
    Hello all,
    I have been shooting handguns for the last 12 years. While I am not an expert, I am happy with how that is coming along. My rifle skills, though, are non-existent. I have a Ruger 10/22 that I play around with but today I set up a 8x8 steel target and plan to work on my rifle skills. I find that I can consistently hit the steel target with my Ruger equipped with iron sights at 50 yards but struggle once I go up to 75. What size steel targets should I have use? Smaller than 8x8 or larger? What distances should I work up to with iron sights? What about red dots? What is a good distance with them? I can't stand scopes and anyway I don't have a use for them at the moment as I work on my skills.

    My family has AR15s but I don't care for them for some reason. I had a Crossman BB gun as a kid so the Ruger 10/22 feels like an old friend. I would like to work up to a Ruger Mini 14 and a M1 Garand some day. Those rifles just feel "right" to me compared to the AR15.

    I'll do some reading on the Internet but wanted to throw this post out there if anyone wanted to offer input. Thanks all!

    Bobby
    Just curious what your reasoning is behind the statement in bold. It's good to be proficient with both types of sighting systems, but you might wish to analyze having an excessive antipathy towards one which is not based in anything solid. In the real world, rifle shooting is a scope game. If you have no use for a scope, that's fine for now and your feelings may change, but just be aware you're placing a self-imposed limit. Most rifles can shoot better than the shooter can see, much less shoot. Even the crappiest surplus centerfire rifle is usually capable of holding a group at distance the average person would be challenged to see or hold. "Seeing better" is key to opening up what a rifle can really do. Keep an open mind.

    As you may have also found with handgun shooting, putting an optic on top of it opens up a whole new way to see your shooting, and can teach you things you weren't necessarily able to see with irons. In the beginning, a scope confronts you with a lot of "movement" you weren't able to see before, which is a challenge. But if you push through this, you learn the important skills of 1) how to properly manage this apparent movement, and 2) how much importance you need to assign, or not assign, to it in the process of executing a shot. Being able to bear down and confidently squeeze off a shot within your wobble zone, when you can see all that movement, and have it hit the plate shows you how much movement you can tolerate. It is more than you think, and most people are surprised by it when they begin to focus on it.

    Also, Revere's Riders would be an excellent introduction. It is an immersive weekend, and you would come out of it enlightened, and will have been exposed to pretty much the entire project of rifle shooting.
    Last edited by Twangbanger; 05-13-2020 at 22:09.

  8. #8
    Expert croy's Avatar

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kirk Freeman View Post
    You need a class, not Internet advice. There is no substitute.

    The software is to the hardware as 3 is to 1.

    A lot of gun owners could learn something from this. Go take a class from a reputable organization.

  9. #9
    Sharpshooter

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    OP offered little to no info about shooting position, fit of rifle, trigger pull, ability to see the target (no scope), etc. All the things that an experienced shooter or competitor would address in the first 30 minutes. Just hooking up with an experienced shooter would be a huge jump start, and any class or coaching would improved skills. Otherwise, as noted above, he's just practicing bad habits.

  10. #10
    Grandmaster MCgrease08's Avatar

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    As others have said, I can't recommend a Revere's Riders 2 day basic rifle class enough. I have taken it three times (twice with 10/22 and once with an AR). I learn something new every time.

    I went into my first class with very little rifle experience. But you'll learn about things like sight picture, natural point of aim, how to zero your rifle, shooting positions; all kinds of things that are going to help you make help make you a better shooter.

    if you like iron sights and don't want to use a scope, then go with that. It's good to learn the fundamentals first.

    Well, I ain't always right but I've never been wrong,
    seldom turns out the way it does in a song.
    Once in a while you get shown the light
    in the strangest of places if you look at it right.

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