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  1. #1
    Plinker

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    Private party sales - what's the common etiquette?

    I know the rules around it are pretty minimal, but how are most private party sales conducted? In California, we had to go into a gun store and the FFL was essentially an intermediary who would ensure the purchaser could legally acquire the firearm. As a seller, that took away a lot of the risk in terms of meeting up with someone and knowing you weren't transferring to a felon, etc.

    • In Indiana, are gun stores a place where two private parties can meet to conduct a sale inside the store? Even though they're not involved in the transaction, it just seems like it would be a good environment to transfer a gun / cash.
    • What's generally considered reasonable due-diligence to ensure the buyer is someone who hasn't lost their right to purchase/own a firearm? As a potential seller, I'd like to minimize my liability.


    Advice would be appreciated!

  2. #2
    Expert DadSmith's Avatar

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    In Indiana if a felon lies about being a criminal and buys your firearm it's on the felon. This isn't the Communist Republic of Kalifornia.

    That said most private sales the seller usually ask if the person has an Indiana ID and a carry permit.

    I myself have not sold a firearm to anyone that doesn't have both.
    Greater love hath no man than this, that a man lay down his life for his friends.

  3. #3
    Grandmaster

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    Legal requirements:
    • You have no reason to believe the buyer is a prohibited person (criminal, under 18, etc). The odd-sounding wording is because we have no way to directly do an FBI background check as gun stores do.
    • The buyer is at least 18 years old.
    • The buyer is an Indiana resident.


    In order to do a good-faith attempt to meet those requirements (can't speak for outside of INGO), many will ask to see an Indiana drivers license (which proves age and residence) and an LTCH (Indiana License to Carry Handgun) which indicates that the state did a background check at some point in the past.

    Anything beyond that is between the buyer and seller. Some sellers will want to create paperwork to prove transfer of ownership. Few (but not unheard of) will go to the step of taking the transaction into a gun store for a formal NICS background check. You will pay for taking their time and resources. Understand that these additional requirements will significantly shrink the pool of buyers who believe in freedom who will be willing to deal with you.

    Although it is possible to do a transaction in a gun store, a much more common scenario is to meet in a public location, generally a well-lit area with cameras (like a store parking lot) to trade. The fact that there is a theoretical potential for things to go badly wrong is why people value being able to do transactions with those they have some level of knowledge and trust- which is why the INGO participation standard is valuable compared to truly anonymous sites like Armslist.
    Antifa should rebrand themselves Vanilla ISIS.

  4. #4
    Grandmaster 1775usmarine's Avatar

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    I give you cash you give me firearm.
    “Son, when the Marine Corps wants you to have a wife, you will be issued one.” -Chesty Puller


  5. #5
    Grandmaster Expat's Avatar

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    Most gun stores aren't going to want you buying and selling guns inside their store...
    Some don't even like you doing it in their parking lot, if they know about it. I have met in the parking lots of large retailers most of the times.

  6. #6
    Master KittySlayer's Avatar

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    Quote Originally Posted by Phase2 View Post
    Although it is possible to do a transaction in a gun store, a much more common scenario is to meet in a public location, generally a well-lit area with cameras (like a store parking lot) to trade.
    A fine balance as you want that public place with some people/cameras around but not so public that some soccer mom is going to call the police because she sees a gun being sold. Daytime is good too.

    Quote Originally Posted by Phase2 View Post
    The fact that there is a theoretical potential for things to go badly wrong...
    Don't be afraid to walk away if things seem hinky, trust your gut. Remember everyone at the transaction is probably carrying a loaded gun. Plus someone has a pile of cash and someone has a gun with some value.

    Quote Originally Posted by Phase2 View Post
    ...why people value being able to do transactions with those they have some level of knowledge and trust- which is why the INGO participation standard is valuable compared to truly anonymous sites like Armslist.
    Ask a few questions and you can get a feel from the private correspondence/conversation if this is someone you want to conduct business with. I have done some non-gun transactions online and every so often just get that weird feeling that meeting in person is not a good idea.
    When seconds matter the 2nd Amendment matters.

  7. #7
    Plinker

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    Makes sense, and I appreciate all the responses. I think the gun stores in CA see the transactions as beneficial because it brings in foot traffic and most people wind up buying ammo, holsters, accessories, etc. when they're there. Driver's license + carry permit seems reasonable.

  8. #8
    Shooter

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    Quote Originally Posted by rhrlaw View Post
    In Indiana, are gun stores a place where two private parties can meet to conduct a sale inside the store? Even though they're not involved in the transaction, it just seems like it would be a good environment to transfer a gun / cash.
    That's like walking in Kroger with a cooler of meat to sell to someone else.

    Find a parking lot, meet, shake hands (or don't), inspect gun, hand over money.




    Quote Originally Posted by rhrlaw View Post
    What's generally considered reasonable due-diligence to ensure the buyer is someone who hasn't lost their right to purchase/own a firearm? As a potential seller, I'd like to minimize my liability.
    You could ask to see a DL & LTCH, or you sell to an INGO member who's part of the community (i.e. more than 51 posts )


    You don't have an obligation by law to do any "reasonable due diligence". If you don't know that they're prohibited, then you're good to go.

  9. #9
    Shooter

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    Quote Originally Posted by 1775usmarine View Post
    I give you cash you give me firearm.
    And maybe trade FFL03's.

  10. #10
    Expert

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    We do all of our personal transactions at gun shows or the parking lot of the local police department. I usually arrive early and let the front desk know whats up if they are open.

    "Too much agreement kills a chat." ~Eldridge Cleaver

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