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  1. #1
    Plinker

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    Hunting close to property lines and homes

    Wanted to see if you all could help me with a question. I have a residence and small 2.5 acre wooded area that buts up to a neighbors woods that is very large. Both our families hunt. Recently I've noticed them hunting during gun season right up on the property line. This puts them approximately 300 yards or less from my house with a clear line of sight across an open field. I completely support their right to be out there enjoying the sport on their own property, but feel their being so close to my residence presents a potential danger to my kids if they shoot in our direction and miss. I've tried to talk to them about the issue and have had no success. Is there any legal ground I can stand on at all? I know some states have legal limits concerning how close you can be to someone's house while hunting with a firearm. I don't believe Indiana has any. I'm not really a fan of non-sence laws, but feel my concerns have some real merrit given the situation

  2. #2
    Sharpshooter mike4sigs's Avatar

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    to ingo
    I am sure you will get a lot opinions on how to handle this situation .
    the only one I have is that Neighbor problems can be one heck of a Headache

  3. #3
    Sharpshooter Winamac's Avatar

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    I had a similar problem a few years back, except I did not own the land I was hunting on but I did have written permission. The guys that were hunting the property that backed up to mine did not own that land either.I had permission on their property as well though. However, they literally had put one of their tree stand 50 yards from mine on the fence row in a tree which was technically on the their hunting property, but was so close to my property that the fence between the properties touched their tree and the tree was actually growing in to the fence. But wait it gets better. They actually had the "balls" to cut out young sapling trees on my side of the fence in order to make shooting lanes on my wooded property.
    I did call them out on all the above and they tried to play the "DUH...I didn't see your stand there and we thought this was all one property" Hey "Gump" shouldn't the fence have been a dead giveaway that these are two separate properties, and Hey "Gump" shouldn't you know the boundaries of the property you are hunting? Then I informed them that as per the local DNR officer they can be held liable for 2X the cost of those saplings once they were full grown.
    This all happened about two weeks before the opening of deer shotgun season. Once I laid into them with the above, I never saw them again and their stand disappeared. I never said anything to either property owner because I was afraid they might say "you know what I don't need this trouble, so no one gets to hunt". Now the property has been taken over by some land manager who moved here from Kansas and wants me to pay him and the land owner $1500.00 a season to hunt there. Needless to say I no longer deer hunt.
    " YOU SERIOUS CLARK ? "

  4. #4
    Grandmaster phylodog's Avatar

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    What they're doing thus far is legal. All you can do is talk to them, express your concerns and hope they'll decide to be considerate and respect your wishes. I don't think your concerns are unrealistic but it is a situation where it isn't a problem until it is. If they sit on the property line and never shoot onto your property you have nothing to worry about and no recourse, as soon as they shoot onto your property you have options but providing proof will be challenging.

    That said, if it is that much of a concern you have the right to do what you want to on your property just like they do. It might just so happen that you really really like the spot on your land right across the fence and love to go out on fall and winter days, spread a blanket out on the ground, listen to some nice death metal music and eat grapes and cheese until dark.
    There's lots of ________ on here who don't fit your particular stereotype, smearing us with goofball sophistry is what is out of line. It just makes gunowners look like *******s.

    - CarmelHP

  5. #5
    I Care...Really
    churchmouse's Avatar

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    Quote Originally Posted by phylodog View Post
    What they're doing thus far is legal. All you can do is talk to them, express your concerns and hope they'll decide to be considerate and respect your wishes. I don't think your concerns are unrealistic but it is a situation where it isn't a problem until it is. If they sit on the property line and never shoot onto your property you have nothing to worry about and no recourse, as soon as they shoot onto your property you have options but providing proof will be challenging.

    That said, if it is that much of a concern you have the right to do what you want to on your property just like they do. It might just so happen that you really really like the spot on your land right across the fence and love to go out on fall and winter days, spread a blanket out on the ground, listen to some nice death metal music and eat grapes and cheese until dark.
    Winner.

  6. #6
    Grandmaster MrsGungho's Avatar

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    Quote Originally Posted by phylodog View Post
    What they're doing thus far is legal. All you can do is talk to them, express your concerns and hope they'll decide to be considerate and respect your wishes. I don't think your concerns are unrealistic but it is a situation where it isn't a problem until it is. If they sit on the property line and never shoot onto your property you have nothing to worry about and no recourse, as soon as they shoot onto your property you have options but providing proof will be challenging.

    That said, if it is that much of a concern you have the right to do what you want to on your property just like they do. It might just so happen that you really really like the spot on your land right across the fence and love to go out on fall and winter days, spread a blanket out on the ground, listen to some nice death metal music and eat grapes and cheese until dark.
    INGO always delivers.
    No doubt exists that all women are crazy; it's only a question of degree ~ W. C. Fields

  7. #7
    Sharpshooter

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    Shot through the heart with their cruel game, they give hunting a bad name.
    Don't forget some nice crisp apples to go with that cheese!

  8. #8
    Grandmaster Hookeye's Avatar

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    First off, there could be a danger even if they don't miss the deer (bullets can go through ya know).
    Up against the fence, as long as they are shooting them on their side that's legally cool.
    If they are in stands, that should up the safety aspect, as shots should be toward the ground.

    Neighbor drive car to fence line to clean it one gun season weekend. Shed, car vac.........chain smoking, yelling back to leaf blowing relative by garage.
    Nice house, hillbillys must have hit the lottery.

    BTW, shooting and houses, think some states have a 100 yard min rule.
    Last edited by Hookeye; 10-21-2018 at 12:44.

  9. #9
    Grandmaster Hookeye's Avatar

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    Come gun season, dress the stepkids in brown and let them run around with white hankies.

  10. #10
    Grandmaster Hookeye's Avatar

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    Actually, doing the death metal picnic would probably fall under hunter harassment, even if on your side.
    Unless of course you have a history of doing this, on that date.....some sort of documented ritual.
    Then the hunters got permission for that place after.

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