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  1. #1
    Master
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    Case coloring receivers or making older case colors pop.

    I have seen a few custom shops that either take factory non finished or made finished receivers and turn them into case colored items. Here would be an example.

    https://hendershots.net/product/marl...22-long-rifle/

    How are they producing such items and would it be possible to do to say an older finished reciever and then use a case coloring process. I had always thought that the case color comes as a product of both the heat treating of the a combination of metals/chemicals (charcoal and bone) to bring out case colors. Are they making new receivers and case coloring those. I do take it that the above model 39 marlin would be out of copy rights

    Then if a firearm already has case color but it is muted or maybe was not that strong in the beginning (like one of the Oder single shot rifles and shotguns ) is there a way to make the say pop again.

    And this an AR-15 with a case hardened reciever would have to be made with steel. I think I saw a turnbull on once.

    This would not be a restoration project more of an refinish of items to give them a higher appeal to the eye. And older gun that has seen it fair share of a work life.

  2. #2
    Sharpshooter walt o's Avatar
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    I have had several hammer & trigger case colored ,also had a grip safety colored for a 1903 colt
    " Everybody in the world is ignorant.....Just about different things."

  3. #3
    Grandmaster patience0830's Avatar
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    Doug Turnbull. Google him and his work.
    It requires an O'dark30 workout, not layin' in the fart sack.

  4. #4
    Master
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    Turnbull = expensive. Hendershots = expensive. Great work but above my pay grade.

    Looking for a low cost solution to a high end issue most likely.

  5. #5
    Marksman Squirt239's Avatar
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    Everything that I have seen for the DIY'er doesn't produce a quality finish like that. I suppose it goes back to the "you get what you pay for." At one time, I thought maybe it would be an area that would be beneficial for my shop, until I saw the price of the equipment, the time investment associated, and the liability. You see, it's not hard to screw one of those receivers up. Too much heat, it'll crack, warp, or even melt. Too little heat and you've got a terrible finish.

    I was once told a story (unsure if it's true...) of a ship mechanic. Ship docked and no one on the crew could fix it. Mechanic came down, listened to the motor, took out a hammer and tapped lightly on the motor. Ship worked great. Ship's captain received a bill for $10,000. When he docked again, he found the mechanic and questioned his bill. You charged me $10,000 to tap on the motor with a hammer??? No, I charged you $1 to tap the motor. It was $9,999 to know where to tap.

    Case hardening is expensive because the guys that do it know where to tap. Further, trying to enhance an old job, just doesn't seem likely. I'm sure there are products out there that can polish a surface and bring back the sheen, but to what extent? Who knows. The only metal polish I have used that has been good (mainly for removing light surface rust) has been Lucas metal polish. That stuff just flat out works. Will it work for case hardening? I don't know...never tried it. I suppose it's worth a shot.

    Good luck in your ventures.
    Stay safe,

    Brett Havlin

  6. #6
    Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by Squirt239 View Post
    Everything that I have seen for the DIY'er doesn't produce a quality finish like that. I suppose it goes back to the "you get what you pay for." At one time, I thought maybe it would be an area that would be beneficial for my shop, until I saw the price of the equipment, the time investment associated, and the liability. You see, it's not hard to screw one of those receivers up. Too much heat, it'll crack, warp, or even melt. Too little heat and you've got a terrible finish.

    I was once told a story (unsure if it's true...) of a ship mechanic. Ship docked and no one on the crew could fix it. Mechanic came down, listened to the motor, took out a hammer and tapped lightly on the motor. Ship worked great. Ship's captain received a bill for $10,000. When he docked again, he found the mechanic and questioned his bill. You charged me $10,000 to tap on the motor with a hammer??? No, I charged you $1 to tap the motor. It was $9,999 to know where to tap.

    Case hardening is expensive because the guys that do it know where to tap. Further, trying to enhance an old job, just doesn't seem likely. I'm sure there are products out there that can polish a surface and bring back the sheen, but to what extent? Who knows. The only metal polish I have used that has been good (mainly for removing light surface rust) has been Lucas metal polish. That stuff just flat out works. Will it work for case hardening? I don't know...never tried it. I suppose it's worth a shot.

    Good luck in your ventures.
    bought a small collection of shooters. I know Mr. Lucas . I will get some Lucas metal polish.

  7. #7
    Grandmaster Alpo's Avatar
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    Back in the day, I worked on the restoration of a number of 19th century firearms and their reproductions. I used to send items out for case coloring to a gentleman in Nebraska who did excellent work...but as has been mentioned...not inexpensive.

    In the case of touchup work to an older finish, Dicropan can help restore blues and greens fairly well. It is a cold chemical reaction with the surface and does not change the metallic structure of the part. You might be pleased with the results.

    However, if the firearm that you have in mind has any collectors value, it is best to leave it as is.
    I all too often ran out of talent well before the exit of the turn. (© Señor Mouse)

  8. #8
    Master
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    These are most all just shooter firearms. I will look into dicropan also.

    Just looking to add a little flash. The blues and green to pop would most definitely give it that added touch.

  9. #9
    Grandmaster Alpo's Avatar
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    Seal the Dicropan with gun oil before using any cleaner. In fact, I'd stay away from combined cleaner/lube products in that area.
    I all too often ran out of talent well before the exit of the turn. (© Señor Mouse)

  10. #10
    Plinker
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    If you want some nice case coloring, look up Tyler Gunworks. Bobby Tyler does some excellent work and is reasonably on top of that. Here's a couple he did for me
    IMG_1604e.jpgBearcat RS.jpg
    Attached Images Attached Images

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