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Thread: Arizona SB 1625: Assault Weapons; Magazines; Prohibition; Registration

  1. #1
    Plinker Lmo1131's Avatar

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    Arizona SB 1625: Assault Weapons; Magazines; Prohibition; Registration

    This is Arizona, but we need to be aware of what's going on around us (even if it's 1,700 miles away).

    Submitted Thursday 2 February, 2020.

    Arizona SB 1625 text

    "It's what you learn, after you know it all, that counts." _ John Wooden

  2. #2
    Expert

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    I got through half the list of senators, all Dems. Go figure.

  3. #3
    JAL
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    This Arizona Senate bill won't go anywhere. It's grandstanding by the state senators that sponsored it pandering to their constituencies. The Arizona House, Senate and Governor's Mansion are all Republican. It won't even make it out of sub-committee and will die there. Numerous bills pandering to constituencies with no hope of going anywhere are routinely introduced in every statehouse and in Congress. Most quietly die unless it's a hot-button issue and then it gets brief attention.

    One should study some how a bill actually becomes law. It's not a simple process and is time consuming. Gets assigned to a sub-committee. If approved there it moves to the committee of the whole. If not, it dies for that legislative session. If approved there, it goes to the chamber. If not, it dies. If the speaker of the house or president of the senate doesn't want it to get to the floor for debate and a floor vote, it will get pigeon-holed until the end of the session and it dies. No bill carries over from one session to the next. If it gets to floor vote and passes, it goes to the other chamber where the process starts all over again with just as many opportunities to die. More likely than not, there will be amendments in the other chamber if it gets to a floor vote and passes. That triggers a joint committee to attempt to hammer out a compromise between the chambers. Any such compromise must go back for another floor vote in each chamber. Only after that same exact identical bill passes both chambers down to identical punctuation does it go to the governor for signature. This is a gross simplification as there are times when it's even more complicated. Bottom line is bills don't sneak through in the dead of night as the process is much too deliberative and lengthy.

    John
    United States Army, Retired

  4. #4
    Grandmaster DoggyDaddy's Avatar

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    Quote Originally Posted by JAL View Post
    This Arizona Senate bill won't go anywhere. It's grandstanding by the state senators that sponsored it pandering to their constituencies. The Arizona House, Senate and Governor's Mansion are all Republican. It won't even make it out of sub-committee and will die there. Numerous bills pandering to constituencies with no hope of going anywhere are routinely introduced in every statehouse and in Congress. Most quietly die unless it's a hot-button issue and then it gets brief attention.

    One should study some how a bill actually becomes law. It's not a simple process and is time consuming. Gets assigned to a sub-committee. If approved there it moves to the committee of the whole. If not, it dies for that legislative session. If approved there, it goes to the chamber. If not, it dies. If the speaker of the house or president of the senate doesn't want it to get to the floor for debate and a floor vote, it will get pigeon-holed until the end of the session and it dies. No bill carries over from one session to the next. If it gets to floor vote and passes, it goes to the other chamber where the process starts all over again with just as many opportunities to die. More likely than not, there will be amendments in the other chamber if it gets to a floor vote and passes. That triggers a joint committee to attempt to hammer out a compromise between the chambers. Any such compromise must go back for another floor vote in each chamber. Only after that same exact identical bill passes both chambers down to identical punctuation does it go to the governor for signature. This is a gross simplification as there are times when it's even more complicated. Bottom line is bills don't sneak through in the dead of night as the process is much too deliberative and lengthy.

    John
    I don't know... it seems pretty simple...


  5. #5
    Expert BigRed's Avatar

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    There are two "Americas".

    One that believes in Liberty.

    Another that does not.

  6. #6
    Expert ashby koss's Avatar

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    Quote Originally Posted by JAL View Post
    This Arizona Senate bill won't go anywhere. It's grandstanding by the state senators that sponsored it pandering to their constituencies. The Arizona House, Senate and Governor's Mansion are all Republican. It won't even make it out of sub-committee and will die there. Numerous bills pandering to constituencies with no hope of going anywhere are routinely introduced in every statehouse and in Congress. Most quietly die unless it's a hot-button issue and then it gets brief attention.

    One should study some how a bill actually becomes law. It's not a simple process and is time consuming. Gets assigned to a sub-committee. If approved there it moves to the committee of the whole. If not, it dies for that legislative session. If approved there, it goes to the chamber. If not, it dies. If the speaker of the house or president of the senate doesn't want it to get to the floor for debate and a floor vote, it will get pigeon-holed until the end of the session and it dies. No bill carries over from one session to the next. If it gets to floor vote and passes, it goes to the other chamber where the process starts all over again with just as many opportunities to die. More likely than not, there will be amendments in the other chamber if it gets to a floor vote and passes. That triggers a joint committee to attempt to hammer out a compromise between the chambers. Any such compromise must go back for another floor vote in each chamber. Only after that same exact identical bill passes both chambers down to identical punctuation does it go to the governor for signature. This is a gross simplification as there are times when it's even more complicated. Bottom line is bills don't sneak through in the dead of night as the process is much too deliberative and lengthy.

    John

    IMHO it is lazy thinking like this that will doom the protection of our 2nd amendment, then all other parts of the constitution.

    the DEMS and other anti-gunners WILL go through the process and the mess to destroy us. We must not waiver in our ultimatums, then they are just threats in words only.
    http://s6.postimg.org/q3wk2jfe9/Sulu_Shields.jpg

    01000110 01110010 01100101 01100101 01100100 01101111 01101101 00100000 01000110 01101001 01110010 01110011 01110100 00101100 00100000 01000011 01101111 01101110 01100100 01100101 01101101 01101110 00100000 01000011 01101111 01101110 01100110 01101111 01110010 01101101 01101001 01110100 01111001

  7. #7
    Grandmaster jamil's Avatar

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    Quote Originally Posted by JAL View Post
    This Arizona Senate bill won't go anywhere. It's grandstanding by the state senators that sponsored it pandering to their constituencies. The Arizona House, Senate and Governor's Mansion are all Republican. It won't even make it out of sub-committee and will die there. Numerous bills pandering to constituencies with no hope of going anywhere are routinely introduced in every statehouse and in Congress. Most quietly die unless it's a hot-button issue and then it gets brief attention.

    One should study some how a bill actually becomes law. It's not a simple process and is time consuming. Gets assigned to a sub-committee. If approved there it moves to the committee of the whole. If not, it dies for that legislative session. If approved there, it goes to the chamber. If not, it dies. If the speaker of the house or president of the senate doesn't want it to get to the floor for debate and a floor vote, it will get pigeon-holed until the end of the session and it dies. No bill carries over from one session to the next. If it gets to floor vote and passes, it goes to the other chamber where the process starts all over again with just as many opportunities to die. More likely than not, there will be amendments in the other chamber if it gets to a floor vote and passes. That triggers a joint committee to attempt to hammer out a compromise between the chambers. Any such compromise must go back for another floor vote in each chamber. Only after that same exact identical bill passes both chambers down to identical punctuation does it go to the governor for signature. This is a gross simplification as there are times when it's even more complicated. Bottom line is bills don't sneak through in the dead of night as the process is much too deliberative and lengthy.

    John
    Arizona is turning purple. The Republicans have narrow majorities. Senate is 17 Rís to 13 Dís. House is 31 Rís to 29 Dís. Theyíll keep chipping away.
    I have spoken.
    If youíre woke you dig it.

  8. #8
    JAL
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    Quote Originally Posted by DoggyDaddy View Post
    I don't know... it seems pretty simple...

    This is a gross over-simplification for 8 year olds in grade school. There are a lot more steps in the process. The most glaring one is the omission of sub-committees which can including sub-committees which have parts which must bring it to the whole sub-committee and the same with committees. It also omits sub-committee and committee chairs which have immense power to bring matters before them. A bill can simply die by a chair deciding not to bring it before the (sub-)committee. Getting a bill through Congress is a maze having to deal with numerous personalities who have the power to kill it by simply not scheduling it. There are means to force things over the head of a chair, but that's considered a semi-nuke option that can make enormous enemies that will exact retribution in the future. The number of bills at federal and state level that die in the process is enormous.

    John
    United States Army, Retired

  9. #9
    JAL
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    Quote Originally Posted by jamil View Post
    Arizona is turning purple. The Republicans have narrow majorities. Senate is 17 Rís to 13 Dís. House is 31 Rís to 29 Dís. Theyíll keep chipping away.
    I wouldn't doubt that although this was a product of the 2018 mid-term election which typically has a backlash. The real key is the Governor's mansion which would require a super-majority in both chambers to override a governor's veto. I don't see both chambers plus the governor turning blue any time soon.

    John
    United States Army, Retired

  10. #10
    Grandmaster DoggyDaddy's Avatar

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    Quote Originally Posted by JAL View Post
    This is a gross over-simplification for 8 year olds in grade school. There are a lot more steps in the process. The most glaring one is the omission of sub-committees which can including sub-committees which have parts which must bring it to the whole sub-committee and the same with committees. It also omits sub-committee and committee chairs which have immense power to bring matters before them. A bill can simply die by a chair deciding not to bring it before the (sub-)committee. Getting a bill through Congress is a maze having to deal with numerous personalities who have the power to kill it by simply not scheduling it. There are means to force things over the head of a chair, but that's considered a semi-nuke option that can make enormous enemies that will exact retribution in the future. The number of bills at federal and state level that die in the process is enormous.

    John
    It was a joke. Maybe not a good one, but a joke nonetheless.


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