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  1. #1
    Marksman indyblue's Avatar

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    AR 15 cleaning question, why not to lube trigger group

    I read this article at GunsandAmmo.com about cleaning the AR and came across the following passage, but it doesn't explain why to avoid lubing the trigger area. I see many on INGO use non-chlorinated brake cleaner to clean heavy deposits, how do you avoid getting cleaner on your plastic grip/stock as it partially dissolves plastic vs Hoppes which doesn't seem to attack polymer parts.
    7. Inspection and Lubrication

    With the rifle clean, now is an ideal opportunity to inspect the rifle and its components for worn, cracked or broken parts. Some parts on the AR wear faster than others, and itís important to keep track of wear so that parts can be replaced before they break. Pay particular attention to the bolt. Look for hairline cracks where the cam pin enters the body of the bolt, as that is usually where breakage occurs. The locking lugs should also be inspected for cracks or other imperfections. While you are inspecting the bolt, ensure the three gas rings are not alignedótheir slots should all be in different locations to ensure a tight gas seal. Take a look at the bolt carrier and ensure the gas key fits tightly and that the screws are staked into place so they cannot rotate. Any parts that are suspect should be taken to an armorer or gunsmith, or should be replaced.

    With the rifle clean and inspected, it needs to be lubed before reassembly. Semi-auto rifles require more lubrication than most other firearms, so donít skimp on the lube. I use lithium grease because it doesnít migrate when hot, but any gun oil will work. Your rifle will tell you where to apply lube since those areas will have their finish worn from friction. The outside of the bolt body, bolt locking lugs and the four longitudinal ridges on the bolt carrier are key lubrication points on the AR. Conversely, I avoid using lube in the firing pin channel or on the trigger parts.


    I like to keep my trigger well lubed as it runs smoother. The Colt trigger seems to take too much effort otherwise. In a dirty/sandy/dusty environment I could see why you'd want to keep the internals as dry as possible to avoid attracting grit.
    Last edited by indyblue; 09-16-2013 at 12:34.

  2. #2
    Leo
    Leo is offline
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    The firing pin channel will collect up soot and dust if the firing pin is oily. If it gets too gummy you can either have light primer strikes or a slam fire. I use Hornady one shot gun cleaner and dry lube as a low residue cleaner, that does not seem to gum up. I only clean my rifle after 3 or 4 matches. The firing pin is still floating in the BCG when I do clean the rifle. Each match takes 88 rounds so 264 to 356 rounds there is no problems. It may be good for longer, but I seldom wait that long to at least clean the BCG.

    I only spray out the trigger with One Shot gun cleaner and dry lube and the smallest dab of gunslik on the sear surface that I possibly can get there with a tooth pick. That has been enough to work for me since the late 70's.


    I also index the gas rings to make sure the slots line up, it seems to make sense. I have actually tried shooting an standard A-2 configuration AR-15 with all the gas rings lined up so that it would supposedly lose pressure. Guess what? Every ammo I tried in it shot fine, from the plain jane Remington 55 gr to my light 100 yard target loads to my Max 77 grain loads. The rifle just plain did not care.


    I don't know much about parts showing wear. I wore out three Krieger SS match barrels on one of my AR's. My definition of a worn out barrel is when it will not print a 20 shot group in the 1 MOA range. That is in the neighborhood of 12-15,000 rounds I never saw wear on anything, never even changed a spring.
    Last edited by Leo; 09-16-2013 at 15:21.

  3. #3
    Expert N_K_1984's Avatar

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    Wipe down & lube every 500 rounds, detail strip & full clean every 1,000.

    My $.02
    Support Our Troops God Bless America

  4. #4
    Plinker

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    Quote Originally Posted by N_K_1984 View Post
    Wipe down & lube every 500 rounds, detail strip & full clean every 1,000.

    My $.02
    +1

  5. #5
    Plinker jotto's Avatar

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    Quote Originally Posted by N_K_1984 View Post
    Wipe down & lube every 500 rounds, detail strip & full clean every 1,000.

    My $.02
    Agreed

  6. #6
    Marksman indyblue's Avatar

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    I clean (barrel & BCG) after every other shoot and lube before every shoot. I only do a total breakdown/clean after ~1K rounds.

    I have been using Lucas Synthetic Gun oil for over 10 years now and it doesn't gum at all. I have no trouble with the firing pin as this a very easy part to keep clean. But the lower receiver is a pain to clean esp. if your have to stay away from the trigger group.

    I still wonder why the G&A article says not to lube the trigger group. Anyone?? If the "experts" at G&A say this someone must know.
    Last edited by indyblue; 09-17-2013 at 11:24.

  7. #7
    Grandmaster sloughfoot's Avatar

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    Because it is a single stage trigger. The rough trigger gives some protection against inadvertant discharge. If you lube it and smooth it out, you won't have any tactile response to finger pressure.

    I absolutely detest single stage triggers. I demand a two stage on all of my serious rifles. Both match and SD rifles.
    Red Fire 372

  8. #8
    Expert N_K_1984's Avatar

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    People tend to over think cleaning. The AR15 is a lot more resilient than many think. As far as the FCG, directly apply a few drops of oil to each coil of the trigger & hammer springs. Then just run through a dry, function check. In most cases, that's enough to get the grit freed up, and the oil to penetrate the springs. Beyond that, nothing more is needed. Again, my $.02
    Support Our Troops God Bless America

  9. #9
    Leo
    Leo is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by sloughfoot View Post
    I absolutely detest single stage triggers. I demand a two stage on all of my serious rifles. Both match and SD rifles.
    I loved the Jewell two stage triggers but it is impossible to find one, and the RRA two stage was ok. The Bushmaster two stage match trigger that came in the DCM rifle has gotten a little flaky, so I have swallowed hard and coughed up the price of the top of the line Geissle. I haven't opened it yet hoping to find a Jewell. When I got out of the matches 10 years ago, the Jewell triggers were very common. I don't know where they all went. If anyone has one laying around, let me know.

  10. #10
    Grandmaster sloughfoot's Avatar

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    I have one for a large pin Colt. It has very long lock time compared to the RRA two stage with a Wolff extra power hammer spring.

    You can actually detect the difference when dry firing.

    Red Fire 372

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