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Poll: Which is better a 50 or 100 yard zero on a .22lr rifle?

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  1. #1
    Master DanVoils's Avatar

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    50 versus 100 yard zero on a .22lr rifle

    Some friends and I have discussed which is better; a 50 or 100 yard zero on a .22lr rifle. I think knowing it's a 50 yard zero and using hold over/BDC is better than using a hold under. Since most of my shots would be at 50 to 75 yards I think not having to reverse engineer the BDC is better.
    Any thoughts or credible data on which is better?

  2. #2
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    I guess it would depend on what you plan to do with the rifle. If it's a field hunter, 50 would be about right. Of course that depends on what your hunting and how for you will be shooting at a given range. If it's a range gun and you shoot at 100 yds all the time, 100 is the correct answer.

    50 yards is where I zero mine in. I shoot them at 100 yds so I know the holdover.


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  3. #3
    Midnight Rider

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    Sight-in Your .22 LR Rifle At 75 Yards!

    ...
    Zero range...Muzzle...25 yards...50 yards...75 yards...100 yards

    25 yds...........-1.5..........+/-0...........-0.06........-1.89.........-5.59
    50 yds...........-1.5..........-0.01..........+/-0.........-1.80.........-5.47
    75 yds...........-1.5..........+0.59.........+1.19.......+/-0..........-3.10
    100yds..........-1.5..........+1.38.........+2.76.......+2.33...... ..+/-0
    ...

    Last edited by bwframe; 08-10-2017 at 20:21.
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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bigtanker View Post
    I guess it would depend on what you plan to do with the rifle. If it's a field hunter, 50 would be about right. Of course that depends on what your hunting and how for you will be shooting at a given range. If it's a range gun and you shoot at 100 yds all the time, 100 is the correct answer.

    50 yards is where I zero mine in. I shoot them at 100 yds so I know the holdover.
    50 is the number we use and the hold over is easy to figure.
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  5. #5
    Sharpshooter King31's Avatar

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    I definitely think a 50 yard would be much better. Mine is always lined up at about 25 yards for squirrel hunting though. It drops about 6 inches at 100 which is pretty consistent with that data. I never shoot over 50 yards in the woods, so it is all about your intended use.
    Trevor | NRA Life Member

  6. #6
    User Unknown

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    Why wouldn't you just generate a set of zeroes for every range you need, then dial appropriately?!

    Yes, there are some sighting systems that don't lend well to this approach, but most modern scopes do fine.

    A lot of guys get married to "da zero" like it is some immovable constant. That's bullhockey, so don't be that guy. Even if you DON'T dial for range as I do, most rimfire rifles need their POI checked regularly, and they ALL need different zeroes for winter use of the same ammo.

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  7. #7
    Master Twangbanger's Avatar

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    Quote Originally Posted by natdscott View Post
    Why wouldn't you just generate a set of zeroes for every range you need, then dial appropriately?!

    Yes, there are some sighting systems that don't lend well to this approach, but most modern scopes do fine.

    A lot of guys get married to "da zero" like it is some immovable constant. That's bullhockey, so don't be that guThe solution is not finding a better "range" to zero at. y. Even if you DON'T dial for range as I do, most rimfire rifles need their POI checked regularly, and they ALL need different zeroes for winter use of the same ammo.

    -Nate
    EggZactly! "Battle sight zero" is an anti-riflemanship concept that needs to be banished to some remote island. Rifles are artillery pieces, not laser beams, and 22 LR is a "rainbow" cartridge. A parabola, is a parabola, is a parabola...finding the "right" distance to zero at is not the answer.

    If a 2~3" mid-range hold-under on a 100 yd. zero is "too imprecise" for the type of target you're shooting...then you probably need to be learning your rifle, mapping your scope and cranking your knobs.
    Last edited by Twangbanger; 08-10-2017 at 22:10.

  8. #8
    Grandmaster patience0830's Avatar

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    Quote Originally Posted by bwframe View Post
    Sight-in Your .22 LR Rifle At 75 Yards!

    ...
    Zero range...Muzzle...25 yards...50 yards...75 yards...100 yards

    25 yds...........-1.5..........+/-0...........-0.06........-1.89.........-5.59
    50 yds...........-1.5..........-0.01..........+/-0.........-1.80.........-5.47
    75 yds...........-1.5..........+0.59.........+1.19.......+/-0..........-3.10
    100yds..........-1.5..........+1.38.........+2.76.......+2.33...... ..+/-0
    ...

    With what ammo?


    32 yds because thats how far it is from the pump house to the target stand. And it works in the squirrel woods.
    Parkerizing lollipops since 1973.

  9. #9
    Midnight Rider

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    Quote Originally Posted by patience0830 View Post
    With what ammo?...
    From the article in the link:

    ...Here is a simple table that shows the results of using a ballistic calculator. This is the trajectory in inches for a typical .22 LR 40 grain, round nose bullet at 1255 fps MV when zeroed at different ranges.

    Zero range...Muzzle...25 yards...50 yards...75 yards...100 yards
    25 yds...........-1.5..........+/-0...........-0.06........-1.89.........-5.59
    50 yds...........-1.5..........-0.01..........+/-0.........-1.80.........-5.47
    75 yds...........-1.5..........+0.59.........+1.19.......+/-0..........-3.10
    100yds..........-1.5..........+1.38.........+2.76.......+2.33...... ..+/-0

    A few comments are in order. All calculations start with -1.5 inches, because this is the difference between the center line of the bore of the rifle barrel and the center line of the scope (the line of sight). When zeroing a rifle for hunting small game animals, due to the small size of their kill zone, it is reasonable and customary to allow the bullet no more than +/- 1.5 inches deviation from the line of sight. +/- 1.5 inches thus defines the maximum point blank range (MPBR) of a .22 LR hunting rifle...
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  10. #10
    Sharpshooter 55fairlane's Avatar

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    I do a 25m zero, then I rezero at 50m,75m and 100m. I then make up a "dope chart" cut it out and paste it inside my rear scope cap.....



    Aaron


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