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  1. #1
    Plinker

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    1928 Browning SAS - safe to shoot??

    Im relatively new to shotguns and new to these forums, so I hope I don't sound like a complete idiot here.
    My dad just recently gave me my grandfathers Browning SAS. My plan is to take apart and try to revive it so to speak.
    I doubt i ever will fire it, but if i decided to, would it be safe?? And by safe i mean, how much impact does steel shot vs. lead shot have on the gun?
    Do you have ammo recommendations?

    Im guessing this has been a forum topic before, but any help is appreciated. thanks!

  2. #2
    Expert Gunaria's Avatar

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    Is it full choke? I wouldn't fire steel shot out of it.
    Quote Originally Posted by bigretic View Post
    bump...great deal!!!still here...free lube with purchase...

  3. #3
    Grandmaster indiucky's Avatar

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    I am pretty familiar with firearms of that vintage and I am not familiar with SAS from Browning...Is it perhaps an A5 or a "Humpback" Browning??? Is it an Over under????

    I.E. This??????




    Or this???

    Quote Originally Posted by patience0830 View Post
    Thread killing historian.

  4. #4
    Marksman Old Dog's Avatar

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    To be safe for sure, I would not fire steel shot in any shotgun built before the advent of steel shot. Barrel metal may be too soft to handle hard steel shot.
    The colors red, white, and blue stand for freedom until they are flashing behind you.

  5. #5
    Expert ru44mag's Avatar

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    Quote Originally Posted by indiucky View Post
    I am pretty familiar with firearms of that vintage and I am not familiar with SAS from Browning...Is it perhaps an A5 or a "Humpback" Browning??? Is it an Over under????

    I.E. This??????






















    Or this???


    You always have the coolest stuff!!

  6. #6
    Master Libertarian01's Avatar

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    I have multiple rifles from WWI and they are just fine to shoot. As long as there is no obvious metallurgical damage it should be good to go.

    I have also fired ammunition from pre WWII, WWII, and the 50's. All of this is fine as well, but don't expect to win any long range target contests. The olde stuff isn't as accurate as the new. With the olde military ammo be 100% certain to clean the bore after every use with any cleaner that will neutralize the corrosive ammo. All that aside, it is fun to shoot and reasonably accurate out to 100 yards.

    If you get into the WWII era British stuff avoid the Pakistani ammo along with the British ammo with cordite. I have some and it will go off but is nowhere near as reliable as other ammo from the same era.

    Regards,

    Doug
    Then out spake brave Horatius, The Captain of the Gate: "To every man upon this earth, Death cometh soon or late.
    And how can a man die better, Than facing fearful odds, For the ashes of his fathers, and the temples of his Gods?" - T.B. Macaulay

    "Idiocracy wasn't a movie. It was prophecy." - CathyInBlue

  7. #7
    Grandmaster halfmileharry's Avatar

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kevinslaterjr View Post
    Wow this is good info
    It is full choke with no O/U
    Its actually manufactured by Remington under a Browning patent and is the humpback design
    The only visible structure flaw i can really see is a crack in the stock but i havent looked at the internals yet
    again, new shotguns...where would one find ammo that wont kill my gun?
    IS yours the Remington Model 11 then?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6aX4W4HVo_U
    The more you sweat in training the less you bleed in battle.

  8. #8
    Marksman trophyhunter's Avatar

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kevinslaterjr View Post
    Wow this is good info
    It is full choke with no O/U
    Its actually manufactured by Remington under a Browning patent and is the humpback design
    The only visible structure flaw i can really see is a crack in the stock but i havent looked at the internals yet
    again, new shotguns...where would one find ammo that wont kill my gun?
    Any modern smokeless powder load with lead shot is fine for your grandfathers Remington, those are stout actions but steer clear of any steel loads you run the risk of a barrel bulge or worse. Numrich gun parts has anything you need to get and keep it running have fun with it.
    Annoy a liberal -work hard and be happy!

  9. #9
    Grandmaster halfmileharry's Avatar

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kevinslaterjr View Post
    Yes remington 11
    Thanks all for the info
    My first pheasant hunt I carried a Model 11. A big cock came up and I fired on him. Five rounds came out of that gun quicker than hurry up. The barrel was pointing straight up by the last shot. I was 12 and it was my first time with a semi auto shotgun.
    I would't shoot steel shot in them but I would't worry about much else shell wise.
    You can use the Browning break down videos for reassembly and maintenance. You can also use the Browning procedures for low and high power shell use.
    The more you sweat in training the less you bleed in battle.

  10. #10
    Marksman

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    Was made to hunt ducks and pheasant with game loads. Featherlites probably wouldn't cycle the action proper. Stick with standard velocity lead and it should be fine. Clean and lube it first.

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