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  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by bwframe View Post
    I've been known to shoot matches cold as practice and skills tests. Determining how well my gun handling might work for self defense.
    Agreed!!!

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Elzinga View Post
    Burl is spot on as usual, let your cold performance be an eye opener. Your cold performance is your real performance.
    Truly an eye opener, your first couple cold shots is a base line for self defense. Especially when competing if one still gets the pre-performance "jitters."

  3. #13
    This thread is (was?) about sport shooting...however I'm having trouble recalling the name of which tactical trainer it is who recommends allowing skill to go cold? As a desirable and enlightening experience? Who was that guy?

  4. #14
    Master rvb's Avatar
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    IMO, Shooting "cold" = not "warmed up," or not "grooved in."
    I feel I shoot every stage "cold." I don't feel I ever get "warmed up" with just 20 seconds of shooting every 45 minutes. Every stage could have been better if I could have spent 5 minutes live firing right before "make ready." Every stage is a "cold" performance (other than the position/footwork rehearsals from the walkthrough). It's the reason my "cold" drill times/HFs are not as good as my "warmed up" drill scores in practice.

    Going to a range sometime the week beforehand, or even the day before, is practice. It's not getting "warmed up." In fact, if you haven't been practicing on a regular basis (incl dryfire), it can even be detrimental. There's nothing wrong with having a practice session right before a match if it's part of a regular practice schedule. However, Practicing right before a match in a last ditch effort to salvage an off-season of laziness will very likely leave you frustrated going into the match.

    Improving your baseline ability is called practice. If you haven't put in the work in advance, then no amount of "warming up" is going to replace that lost practice.

    if you leave a match frustrated with your "cold" performance, well, that's just telling you where your skill is currently at. The "cold" performance IS your performance.

    2c

    -rvb
    Ryan V. B. TY56060 Come shoot USPSA w Ft Wayne Area Practical Shooters: www.facebook.com/fwuspsa

  5. #15
    Master rvb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 7920drew View Post
    . You'll probably get more out of ten 20 minute dryfire sessions in between matches than you will from a single live fire practice session.
    Ryan V. B. TY56060 Come shoot USPSA w Ft Wayne Area Practical Shooters: www.facebook.com/fwuspsa

  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by rvb View Post
    ...Every stage could have been better if I could have spent 5 minutes live firing right before "make ready."...Going to a range sometime the week beforehand, or even the day before, is practice...Improving your baseline ability is called practice...
    Right? The matches I've gone too don't have a "warm up station" off to the side (and it's sorta kinda discouraged in the "Safe Area" (!)).

    I want to get like you guys some day, where you're so good at running and transitioning the gun, (I'm presuming) you can see it in your sleep. But I'm not there yet. I see a fair tendency in new shooters to get things like completely unexplained misses. And for someone like that, (and I offer this advice with due respect, because I'm nowhere near as good as you) depending on the reason for the misses, it's possible no amount of dry fire practice is ever going to fix that. If it's jerking the sights, I think dry fire helps. But if it's simply being unfamiliar with how much sight picture you need, for example, to hit tricky head shots in a given classifier at a given distance, only bullet holes in paper (connected with observation of what happened over the gun) can address that sort of thing.

    But I totally agree. Shooting before the match is indeed called "practice." And where I come from, that's not considered cheating! (but I will read the next set of rule revisions very carefully...)

  7. #17
    I know an indoor range where drawing from the holster is allowed.
    No one is stronger or more dangerous than the man who can harness his emotions.

    www.BrightFirearmsTraining.com

    Drawing from the holster is permitted at Parabellum.

    abright@ccrtc.com


  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by Coach View Post
    I know an indoor range where drawing from the holster is allowed.
    (Shhhhh...whaddya on the payroll or something? You're going to let everybody in on The Secret! Just tell 'em to dryfire...wink)

  9. #19
    Master rvb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Twangbanger View Post
    I see a fair tendency in new shooters to get things like completely unexplained misses. And for someone like that, (and I offer this advice with due respect, because I'm nowhere near as good as you) depending on the reason for the misses, it's possible no amount of dry fire practice is ever going to fix that. If it's jerking the sights, I think dry fire helps. But if it's simply being unfamiliar with how much sight picture you need, for example, to hit tricky head shots in a given classifier at a given distance, only bullet holes in paper (connected with observation of what happened over the gun) can address that sort of thing.
    Thats getting into a whole other topic from the going in "cold" question.... Now you are getting into shot calling, which is one of the most critical skills in shooting. And yes, live fire is critical to learning shot calling. There are quite a few threads on that topic.

    -rvb
    Ryan V. B. TY56060 Come shoot USPSA w Ft Wayne Area Practical Shooters: www.facebook.com/fwuspsa

  10. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by Twangbanger View Post
    This thread is (was?) about sport shooting...however I'm having trouble recalling the name of which tactical trainer it is who recommends allowing skill to go cold? As a desirable and enlightening experience? Who was that guy?
    The one who DOESn't make money with firearms in any way, who works 6-7 days a week 10-12 (or more) hours a day, who has a family that wants his time, who just might have other hobbies. NOT the guy who is wearing the shirt with the catchy slogan about training harder than your adversary so when you meet him you defeat him.

    Equal is not always FAIR and what's FAIR is not always equal.

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