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  1. #1
    Grandmaster Coach's Avatar

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    Carry Gun Match Observations

    With only three of these matches under our belt. Some observations.

    The three winners have a combined 1 mike (miss) in those three wins.

    Two of the three wins have gone to a full size 1911.

    One win went to a stock M&P 2.0. (it has orange paint on the front sight) This gun was second in the other two matches without the paint.
    Full disclosure it is actually finger nail polish.

    The fastest time has only won the match once. Accuracy seems to matter. (surprise)

    One of the winners with his 1911 had many accuracy problems with a small pistol in the first match. I am concluding that little guns are harder to shoot.

    Open category has not had a win yet.

    Someone said to me last night at the match that lasers are not very effective. I won't put her name here, but found her observation to be very interesting.

    Anybody have anything to add?
    No one is stronger or more dangerous than the man who can harness his emotions.

    www.BrightFirearmsTraining.com

    abright@ccrtc.com


  2. #2
    Plinker

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    With regard to “lasers not being effective”, is there a chance the more accurate statement would be “the guy using the laser isn’t very effective?” I practice much more without, but do shoot better (believe it or not looking at my scores) with laser. Thoughts?

  3. #3
    Hop
    Hop is offline
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    I want to try this with a 6 shot snubbie.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mattroth54 View Post
    With regard to “lasers not being effective”, is there a chance the more accurate statement would be “the guy using the laser isn’t very effective?” I practice much more without, but do shoot better (believe it or not looking at my scores) with laser. Thoughts?
    Just passing on what I was told.

    My view on lasers has always been they have a time and a place. I don't think their place is getting hits, or the only way to get hits. Meaning that if I can only get hits with the laser then I am using them improperly. The laser is creating a target focus and a front sight focus is a recipe for getting hits. My thought would be to get better at using the iron sights. Some shot calling work would go a long way in making that happen. Lasers are being used for a crutch if that is indeed your best hits.

    The shooter is the greatest variable. If the shooter improves the results will improve. I cannot see a reason why you cannot get good hits with the iron sights. Perhaps you are wearing contacts. But by judging your physical abilities it would seem you have much untapped potential even shooting a gun with a sight radius that small.
    No one is stronger or more dangerous than the man who can harness his emotions.

    www.BrightFirearmsTraining.com

    abright@ccrtc.com


  5. #5
    Plinker

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    I’ll make 100% of my practice prior to 2-26 iron sight work and shoot the same gun limited and see where it takes me. Really appreciate the feedback.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hop View Post
    I want to try this with a 6 shot snubbie.
    Do it.
    No one is stronger or more dangerous than the man who can harness his emotions.

    www.BrightFirearmsTraining.com

    abright@ccrtc.com


  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mattroth54 View Post
    I’ll make 100% of my practice prior to 2-26 iron sight work and shoot the same gun limited and see where it takes me. Really appreciate the feedback.
    Let the front sight set the speed. Don't shoot faster that you can have a sight picture per shot fired.
    No one is stronger or more dangerous than the man who can harness his emotions.

    www.BrightFirearmsTraining.com

    abright@ccrtc.com


  8. #8
    Plinker

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    That’s what’s held me back...speed when using front sight. Is increasing my speed just a function of repetition? Anything else you’d tell me to work on over the next couple weeks?

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mattroth54 View Post
    That’s what’s held me back...speed when using front sight. Is increasing my speed just a function of repetition? Anything else you’d tell me to work on over the next couple weeks?
    Dry fire will increase the speed at which you can drive the gun. It takes time and repetition to get better at it. Speed is a trap. We all get caught up in going faster than we can see the sights and that will translate to poor hits and to misses. Many people think pulling the trigger fast is the key to faster times.

    Good smooth presentation or draw, faster reloads and target to target transition are where the biggest batches of time can be found doing the types of things we are doing in this match.
    No one is stronger or more dangerous than the man who can harness his emotions.

    www.BrightFirearmsTraining.com

    abright@ccrtc.com


  10. #10
    rvb
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mattroth54 View Post
    That’s what’s held me back...speed when using front sight. Is increasing my speed just a function of repetition? Anything else you’d tell me to work on over the next couple weeks?
    There is a mechanical component (consistent grip, trigger manipulation, etc) to speed shooting that can be worked on in dryfire, but most of shooting fast is in the seeing. It's like I said in the other carry gun match thread, shot calling is critical. You can't quickly recover the sights, make adjustments in aim, and fire if you can't see the sight move in recoil. Training the vision is the most important part of speed shooting. Most newer shooters only see the sight just before or just as the shot breaks, then "find" it again as the gun settles. Better shooters can see the sight lift and call the shot. But to shoot fast you need to see it through the entire recoil.

    Two best ways, IMO, to train the vision for speed shooting are 1) slow fire shot calling. really focus on knowing where the sights were on the target when the shot broke, and visually tracking the sight through it's lift and return. 2) shoot fast into a berm, no target. just focus on trying to track the front sight and to get it to return into the rear notch. Make sure you're safe doing this, eg may need to stand close to the berm in case you get a little out of control..

    Now all that said, most of the "speed" in our sport comes from efficient movement, good stage planning, and good transitions between targets. You won't gain a whole lot of time just learning to shoot fast (unless the classifier is "Can you Count"). dryfire books from Stoeger and Anderson have lots of basic movement and transition drills.

    -rvb
    Ryan V. B. TY56060 Come shoot USPSA w Ft Wayne Area Practical Shooters: www.facebook.com/fwuspsa

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