Join INGunOwners For Free
Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 28
  1. #1
    Plinker

    User Info Menu

    DQ on my first stage! (What the sport is like for a new shooter)

    My first USPSA match I managed to get DQ'ed before my first magazine change. I had spent so much time dry firing, reading, and cranking out ammo on my turret press that it was heartbreaking. I put way too much pressure on myself. I was so focused on not forgetting a target, where I was reloading, and where my positions were that I had IN MY STAGE PLAN the dredded running left reload. I nailed that reload but not before completely breaking the 180. As much as no one wants to get a DQ it did help me.

    It destroyed the ego I had about my shooting, it really humbled me. I had people from multiple squads talk to me about their own DQ's. I got to spend a match as a spectator. I was able to talk and learn instead of worrying about a stage plan.

    FOR THE NEW SHOOTER: you can be the best shooter amongst the people you shoot with but you're not going to win your first match, no one expects you to be the best, you could come in last but if you're safe it's a win. IF you DQ don't throw a hissy fit and run off the range. I sat in my car, beat myself up, then went back to the range and had a great time with great people. The next match I came back ready to shoot and shot what was a good match for my skill level. Don't just thrown in the towel because of one DQ or bad match.

    The people I have meet through this sport are some of the nicest people i have ever met. Thank you to the people in this community who make this sport what it is.

  2. #2
    Marksman Fuzz's Avatar

    User Info Menu

    The above is all true and almost everyone has been there. Myself a few times as well.

    Every story has 2 sides.

    Today I was visiting a club match at a club I have never been to. I was not planning on ROing but the squad had 4-5 shooters with some experience and 7 with very little or none. The RO for the squad and myself were the only qualified RO's there so I get called up again but the RO did run 80% of the shooters with me just giving him a break. Our first stage and the first shooter I ran stepped to the line. He started with the 2 paper on the left and then moved right. running past the 3rd target he realizes it and swings back about 230 degrees. (yes this was poor stage design that he could even see the target from there but that is another issue entirely) I stopped this shooter and asked if he knew why I had stopped him. He said no. I told him and the look on the face of this 6'4" 300lb man was not good. He was pissed. I walked away and left him for the RO to deal with. Later after he calmed down I spoke to him and told him I was sorry but it was my job. He said no problem with an attitude and left for the day.

    Understand NO RO wants to DQ anybody. We hate it too. But it is the game we play. It is not personal.
    MOLAN LABE

  3. #3
    Somewhat Purple-ish rhino's Avatar

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by MuncieFud View Post
    My first USPSA match I managed to get DQ'ed before my first magazine change. I had spent so much time dry firing, reading, and cranking out ammo on my turret press that it was heartbreaking. I put way too much pressure on myself. I was so focused on not forgetting a target, where I was reloading, and where my positions were that I had IN MY STAGE PLAN the dredded running left reload. I nailed that reload but not before completely breaking the 180. As much as no one wants to get a DQ it did help me.

    It destroyed the ego I had about my shooting, it really humbled me. I had people from multiple squads talk to me about their own DQ's. I got to spend a match as a spectator. I was able to talk and learn instead of worrying about a stage plan.

    FOR THE NEW SHOOTER: you can be the best shooter amongst the people you shoot with but you're not going to win your first match, no one expects you to be the best, you could come in last but if you're safe it's a win. IF you DQ don't throw a hissy fit and run off the range. I sat in my car, beat myself up, then went back to the range and had a great time with great people. The next match I came back ready to shoot and shot what was a good match for my skill level. Don't just thrown in the towel because of one DQ or bad match.

    The people I have meet through this sport are some of the nicest people i have ever met. Thank you to the people in this community who make this sport what it is.
    Sounds like you handled it well and correctly used it as a learning experience. Glad to know it won't make it quit . . . first match DQs tend to cause people with fragile egos to never try again.



    "The people shall have a right to bear arms, for the defense of themselves and the State."
    INDIANA CONSTITUTION
    Article 1 - Bill of Rights - Section 32

    ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ

    To prevail you must ACT!

  4. #4
    Grandmaster Coach's Avatar

    User Info Menu

    They there are two kinds of people. Those that have been DQ'ed and those that will be.

    First time shooters at a match should focus solely on safety and nothing else. Everyone wants to do well, that is why you are at a competition, but first things first.

    Also as stated above no RO wants to DQ anyone. But safety has to come first. If half of the world is not enough room for muzzle (inside the 180) then you should not be handling guns. If the DQ is not a consequence then someone will end up getting hurt as sloppy gun handling results from a lack of enforcement. Anyone is capable of screwing this up on any given day, and if today is your day then the RO needs to hold you accountable for what you did. One great thing about USPSA is muzzle discipline if great improved.
    No one is stronger or more dangerous than the man who can harness his emotions.

    www.BrightFirearmsTraining.com

    abright@ccrtc.com


  5. #5
    Expert fullmetaljesus's Avatar

    User Info Menu

    Wait, wait, wait. What competition do they serve ice cream at?

    I'd go to that. I love blizzards.
    WTS/WTT 9mm and 308 win reload dies.

  6. #6
    Plinker Good on paper's Avatar

    User Info Menu

    Iím probably the minority but I feel like the whole if you havenít DQíed youíre going to is kind of a cop out for not being cognizant or being sloppy.
    If youíre a beginner you should be slow and careful enough to not run into the Ďred zoneí and if youíre more experienced you should see where the pitfalls are and ensure that your stage plan keeps you within safe boundaries for you and your squad.
    My $.02
    TY104591

  7. #7
    Somewhat Purple-ish rhino's Avatar

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Good on paper View Post
    Iím probably the minority but I feel like the whole if you havenít DQíed youíre going to is kind of a cop out for not being cognizant or being sloppy.
    If youíre a beginner you should be slow and careful enough to not run into the Ďred zoneí and if youíre more experienced you should see where the pitfalls are and ensure that your stage plan keeps you within safe boundaries for you and your squad.
    My $.02
    I've been shooting USPSA and several of the other actions shooting sports since 1994. I felt the same way as you until I tripped over a fault line in the Indiana section/state match back in 2006 or maybe 2007.



    "The people shall have a right to bear arms, for the defense of themselves and the State."
    INDIANA CONSTITUTION
    Article 1 - Bill of Rights - Section 32

    ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ

    To prevail you must ACT!

  8. #8
    rvb
    rvb is offline
    Grandmaster rvb's Avatar

    User Info Menu

    "It canít happen to me because ...." is just ego talking. Iíve heard it many times before. however, Trip on a fault line, flub a reload, catch the gun on a port, get off your plan due to needing make up shots and get flustered.... none of those are part of anyoneís "plan" but it happens. Heck you may even be DQd because the RO's idea of the 180 is different than yours and you may not even agree with the call. I have seen some crazy DQs over the years, some not even during a COF. ESP when you Mix in extreme weather and long days and other things that can slow a person's judgment. The "it canít happen to me" guys usually are the ones who get all kinds of upset when they DO get the call (them and the "actors" who pretend to be all indignant about a "bad" call in hopes of getting it overturned). Relying on your plan, as you say, isnít always the answer because itís often when the plan has gone to crap that mistakes happen. Iíve had 2 DQs, Iíd guess one about 13 years ago, the other maybe 15. Iím in kind of in a constant fear that I could do it again, which helps me be aware even when my plans have fallen apart. heck, Robby leatham DQd a couple years ago, I think at a national championship event.

    i tripped on a fault line last year... was kinda proud that I kept the muzzle down range and finger off trigger as shown on video.... what the video also showed was the RO didnít catch that I swept my foot as I tumbled and should have been DQd.

    So I donít see it as any kind of "cop out" that I believe itís possible I could DQ in my next match. It actually makes me work harder to ensure it doesnít happen...

    For the OP, a first match can be overwhelming. 180 DQs on reloads when moving to the weak side are very common. This actually is something that as 'Good on Paper' says can be mitigated in stage planning (eg plan to go the other way or finish the reload before moving). Go practice some weak-side reloads in dryfire. Come out next time with your focus on muzzle control and your trigger finger. Go fast, but pay special attention to what it takes to compete safely. Soon, that thinking will become more subconscious allowing you to focus more on performing...

    -rvb
    Ryan V. B. TY56060 Come shoot USPSA w Ft Wayne Area Practical Shooters: www.facebook.com/fwuspsa

  9. #9
    Plinker Good on paper's Avatar

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by rhino View Post
    I've been shooting USPSA and several of the other actions shooting sports since 1994. I felt the same way as you until I tripped over a fault line in the Indiana section/state match back in 2006 or maybe 2007.
    Thatís the part I didnít add, something off the wall is bound to happen to me the next match now
    At the SNS 400 I happened to be at the safe table with Shannon Smith, he told me he got DQed at a national because he had one foot outside the safe table boundary.
    Maybe I came on a little strong...
    TY104591

  10. #10
    Plinker Latewatch's Avatar

    User Info Menu

    I had my first ever DQ at a major 3 gun match after competing for 30 years. It happens to everyone eventually. Learn from it and move on.

    You must prepare your mind for where your body may have to go.

Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Button Dodge