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  1. #1
    Master Grelber's Avatar

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    Sight picture plan on stage walk through?

    When you are coming up with a stage plan, does it include a plan for what an acceptable sight picture is on each target, or is figuring out what you need to see something that just happens as you are shooting the stage?
    In a perfect world liberals would taste good and be easy to field dress.

  2. #2
    Expert Doublehelix's Avatar

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    I am not sure if I have an exact sight picture in mind, but I certainly note the close "blast 'em" targets and the further away "take my time" targets. The blast 'em targets don't really even get a sight picture other than is the barrel pointed in the right direction, whereas the further away targets are fully-focused sight pictures. Everything else gets determined as I go.

    Might be a good thing to add to my stage plans though, thanks for giving a new idea to think about.
    James

    "Never interrupt your enemy when he is making a mistake"
    ~Napoleon Bonaparte~

    Si vis pacem, para bellum.

  3. #3
    Marksman longbeard's Avatar

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    Quote Originally Posted by Grelber View Post
    When you are coming up with a stage plan, does it include a plan for what an acceptable sight picture is on each target, or is figuring out what you need to see something that just happens as you are shooting the stage?
    Stability correlates to sight picture for me. Does the target require me to be stable so I can shoot a well placed shot or can I throw some rounds at it as I am moving, entering or leaving...

  4. #4
    Grandmaster Coach's Avatar

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    I shot a pretty good match at the SNS 400. I had very good sight pictures most of time. I credit having a good match and shooting well to this fact. I shot pretty well at the Battle for the North Coast. I pulled off of seven targets. There was considerable less shooting to be done there. I obviously did not have an acceptable sight picture seven times in 262 rounds.

    This past week in practice I spent the majority of my time trying to see what I need to see to hit the target. I try to have a sight picture on everything but the down and dirty close stuff it is not as detailed of a sight picture as the longer shots or the hard cover/ no shoot protected targets. I spent time working on skunk targets this past week and I am going to do it again this week. Last week's practice session re-taught me that a front sight focus and calling shots is all I can do and all I need to do for the best results I am capable of doing.
    No one is stronger or more dangerous than the man who can harness his emotions.

    www.BrightFirearmsTraining.com

    abright@ccrtc.com


  5. #5
    rvb
    rvb is offline
    Grandmaster rvb's Avatar

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    Quote Originally Posted by Grelber View Post
    When you are coming up with a stage plan, does it include a plan for what an acceptable sight picture is on each target, or is figuring out what you need to see something that just happens as you are shooting the stage?
    acceptable sight picture for each target? no... I mean that comes down to pausing to break a shot if it looks wrong and breaking the shot when it looks right, then trusting your shot call. The most important thing is PLAN TO HAVE A SIGHT PICTURE. call your shots. "too close to aim" or "double taps" are just asking for bad hits or no hits...

    I might decide ahead of time I'd rather take a head shot vs go for the lower A, or maybe I can save a position if all I can see of a target is the C/D zone from somewhere, if that's what you mean... depending on how targets are arranged I might decide ahead of time to accept a less than ideal alignment depending on arrangement of other props/ports, etc (eg when standing back from a port you can't always see the whole target like you would if you are right at the port, so I might plan to accept aiming at whatever part of the target is available)

    Now I also consider OTHER things I want to be sure to actually see... like I might want to know that I'm putting my foot on the right spot for a tight position, or I might remind myself to look at the gun for a table start so I don't miss the grab. Some things you want to visualize and actually see during the course so you don't make a mistake... don't be the guy who adds 2-3 seconds to your stage fumbling to grab a door knob, for instance...

    -rvb
    Ryan V. B. TY56060 Come shoot USPSA w Ft Wayne Area Practical Shooters: www.facebook.com/fwuspsa

  6. #6
    Expert Bosshoss's Avatar

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    My thoughts even though I shoot a division that stresses different points(pun intended) than some of the other divisions.
    Shooting revolver means that I rarely or never have any make up shots available(unless I do a standing reload)during a stage and with minor scoring it changes everything.
    Depending on the stage I have a plan on how to run that stage and a back up plan and sometimes a third plan if things go wrong. I don't need to worry about planning sight pictures.
    I ALWAYS try to have a good sight picture no matter the target difficulty or distance. OK I have done a few hip shots on a target that is less than 10 feet and it is the first target I draw on. I will break the first shot while bringing the gun up into my sight alignment but the second shot is sighted.
    I ran drills where I point shot close targets and then ran them with sight pictures. I would guess that 5% of the point shoot drills were better hit factor than sighted drills. The juice isn't worth the squeeze for me shooting revolver and minor scoring.

    Once you learn to see the front sight come back down from recoil and your grip and shooting platform is solid it isn't that much slower to actually see what is happening. Yes they are times when you see shooter run by a close target and throw a couple of unaimed shots at it and never even pause, and you can get away with that if you know your abilities.

    At my age and size I'm not going to be moving fast thru a course of fire but I try to be efficient and not make any mistakes. The thing I stress is accuracy.

    Jeff look at the results from South Central Sunday match. Even though the overall results don't really matter I beat you(barely but with a revolver I take what I can get )
    You were 22 seconds faster than me in the overall match time. I beat you by being more accurate than you. See how that sight picture thing comes into focus(again pun intended).
    Different stage plans depending on the division you shoot make the comparisons difficult but it can be a eye opener.

  7. #7
    Plinker Good on paper's Avatar

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    One thing I picked up from a podcast recently and is so obvious that I never thought about it is to pick a specific aiming point on each target. Instead of blasting away at the A zone on an open target, shoot at the perforated A in the center. If thereís a no shoot angled to your left of a target donít just shoot in the general vicinity of the brown on the right side aim for the B/C perf or whatever you feel confident about shooting.
    Obvious yeah, but sometimes that escapes me
    TY104591

  8. #8
    Grandmaster Coach's Avatar

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    Aim small hit small. Always a good idea.
    No one is stronger or more dangerous than the man who can harness his emotions.

    www.BrightFirearmsTraining.com

    abright@ccrtc.com


  9. #9
    Marksman Fuzz's Avatar

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    This is some great conversation. I would like to see a lot more of this.

    And to put my efforts in this. I shoot center mass or spray and pray. Seems to be all I got.
    MOLAN LABE

  10. #10
    Plinker Good on paper's Avatar

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    Iíve tried to visualize the sight picture during walk thrus but it seems to get lost once the beep goes.
    I figure that trying to train myself to zero in on a specific aim point might be a more far reaching strategy.

    TY104591

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