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  1. #1
    Master happygunner's Avatar

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    During unload and show clear.....

    Why is it that most people just drop that ammo on the ground and not pick it back up? If you do that for every local match, you just wasted 6 ammo. If going to local matches 3-4 times, that's 18-24 ammo wasted per month. That's a full mag of ammo thrown away. I see this all the time. Makes me cringe.

    So my question is, why waste that much ammo?

  2. #2
    Plinker hammerd13's Avatar

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    One reason I don't tend to pick it up, is that (on a busy range) you may accidentally pick up a round that isn't yours and perhaps wrong caliber. All sorts of bad things can happen if you put unknown ammo in your gun. At 16 cents per round, the risk outweighs the reward for me personally.

    I will, however, roll the gun port-up and eject the round in the air...and usually catch it. That way I know it's mine and hasn't hit the deck (plus it looks cool).
    ďThe most deadly thing on a battlefield is one well-aimed shot.Ē ó Sgt. Carlos Hathcock

  3. #3
    Master happygunner's Avatar

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    I always eject my rounds to where I have it.

  4. #4
    Sharpshooter Trapper Jim's Avatar

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    One of the many training scars left by the shooting sports. Ammo acrobats look cool and save ammo but create a transference of association that is seen by a new shooter in which he adapts to doing which in turns creates a conditioned result that could get him kilt on the street or sweep himself or drop his gun. The few rounds that you canít recover (most ROís watch where your round goes to help you locate it) are a drop of water in the ocean of required rounds you are going to have to shoot each season. There really is no unloading in a defensive situation so the habit of doing it at matches is even more baggage for street principals.

    shoot your course, follow the commands, UASC, let the round fall, take careful aim at the backstop and pull the trigger practicing your trigger control and sight picture. Holster. Leave the grandstanding to the acrobats.
    "See you on the Range"

  5. #5
    Marksman Fuzz's Avatar

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    If you tilt the ejection port upwards and SLOWLY pull the slide back you can get the round to eject onto the gun or between the gun and your hand and it will stay there most of the time. I do this and it works well. Then you do not have to pick it up. Try it after a while it becomes simple.
    MOLAN LABE

  6. #6
    Master happygunner's Avatar

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    Quote Originally Posted by Trapper Jim View Post
    One of the many training scars left by the shooting sports. Ammo acrobats look cool and save ammo but create a transference of association that is seen by a new shooter in which he adapts to doing which in turns creates a conditioned result that could get him kilt on the street or sweep himself or drop his gun. The few rounds that you canít recover (most ROís watch where your round goes to help you locate it) are a drop of water in the ocean of required rounds you are going to have to shoot each season. There really is no unloading in a defensive situation so the habit of doing it at matches is even more baggage for street principals.

    shoot your course, follow the commands, UASC, let the round fall, take careful aim at the backstop and pull the trigger practicing your trigger control and sight picture. Holster. Leave the grandstanding to the acrobats.
    That doesn't justify a waste of ammo. That analogy also isn't true about carry over of bad habits. Plus, competition and defensive shoots are 2 different scenarios. No one is telling you to unload and show clear in a defensive scenario. I also doubt most people eject rounds just to look cool.
    Last edited by happygunner; 2 Weeks Ago at 22:02.

  7. #7
    Grandmaster gregkl's Avatar

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    Catching rounds ranks up there with fast holstering. Form without function. I'm not a competition shooter but I take training classes. I have had RO's and other attendees pick up my round once the range was called safe. And I have picked up my own.

    I don't see it as a good practice or safe for that matter to leave live rounds behind at a range. I police my brass, so I'll police any live rounds.
    Outlier

  8. #8
    Plinker Mitchel's Avatar

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    If you shoot 9mm and pick a major power factor round up instead of yours you prolly wonít like the outcome unless you shoot major power factor I pick one up but donít shoot it. it goes in the bucket or trash because I donít want to blow my gun up.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  9. #9
    Marksman

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    If I see where it lands I may pick it up, but on a range covered in brass it isn't worth the time I take to look for a dropped round.

  10. #10
    Sharpshooter Trapper Jim's Avatar

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    That analogy also isn't true about carry over of bad habits.

    You are kidding right? The AD's, the sweeping, putting partial mags in your belt holders, tweaking guns to an unsafe trigger, brain farts on stage execution, dropping guns, sights falling off, double tap form without function, trick holsters, and many more DO develop a Conditioned Result. Not to mention the many shooters who go unnoticed while they violate the trigger call each weekend. I have seen it first hand carry into Street Carry. Just last week I had two USPSA/IDPA/SCSA shooters new to CCW that was not seating completely. When I pointed this out they said the gun breaks faster on presentation and that's the way they have been shooting and no RO has said anything. I doubt if they will be back as I made them use the holster as intended. Scary. Consider this, If you have driven a car with the shifter on the column for many miles and then went to a floor shifter with a new car, you will find yourself reaching for the column. Then when your even newer car comes along with a push button shifter, you will be reaching for the floor. This is a Conditioned Result and it is all around us in everything that we do. Guns included. The shooting sports are a fantastic place to become one with your equipment and to develop actual shooting skills but one has to get out of them what is important to them. It may not mean winning the match but experience is what you get when you do not get what you want. Many competitors never carry or casual carry (casual carry like casual gunowners that are not committed to the art) so they just don't know or care. Don't take any of this as a downer on the sports as I enjoy and shoot in all of them. But to be clear some habits can kill you.

    Last edited by Trapper Jim; 2 Weeks Ago at 08:25.
    "See you on the Range"

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