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  1. #1
    Plinker

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    Some trap shooting advice (bringing my fiancee into the fold)

    My partner is historically anti-gun, but has been coming around recently and I've got her excited to try trap/sporting clays. She's never shot in her life before.

    I'm a very amateur trap shooter but really enjoy it. For her initial intro though I sorta feel like getting her an introductory lesson with a professional instructor is probably the better way to go. She's also got some health concerns that impact this (pretty substantial surgery on her right shoulder, she's right hand dominant) so other than "heavy semi auto", I'm not really sure what to shop for her for as per a gun for clays. She's a solid 6' and pretty strong, so a little easier than it might be to shop here.

    1) Any one know a (maybe hopefully female) instructor in the NWI Indiana area that I could buy a lesson from for my lady for an intro course?
    2) Any suggestions on what guns to look at? She likes vintage stuff and wood + steel, so that direction might be best. I personally like shooting Model 12s for trap, but I think they probably have more felt recoil than she will be comfy with.

    Thanks for any advice.

    -L

  2. #2
    Plinker

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    Not quite NWI, but when my wife wanted to learn Sporting Clays back in 2013, we went down to Indiana Gun Club and she had a number of lessons with the pro there that does instruction. They also helped her find a shotgun that fit her perfectly and worked well for her (ended up being a Beretta A400). She got really decent in a short amount of time as a result of this arrangement and we had a lot of fun shooting various matches around the state.

    Hope that helps any.

    EDIT: I just saw where the instructor there at IGC, Bob Self, passed away earlier this year. He was a great teacher and seemingly a great person.

  3. #3
    Grandmaster gregkl's Avatar

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    I love shooting the clay's sports and I can see why anyone would want to.

    I do question: "pretty substantial surgery on her right shoulder"

    Is this a recent surgery that hopefully once recovered, she will be good to go?

    Or is it a chronic issue? If it's the latter, maybe shotgunning will not be a good idea long term. I hate to see someone not do an activity because of some limitation but I also like to see someone choose an activity that won't exacerbate a physical limitation. My brother had rotator cuff surgery and had to retire from water skiing. But he could still do archery and he can shoot some shotgun but sticks mostly to pistol these days.

    No matter what shotgun one shoots, you will deal with recoil. It would be a shame to have her cause more injury only to walk away from any kind of shooting activity.

    Anything is possible

  4. #4
    Plinker

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    Thanks for the heads up about Indiana Gun Club. Sad that Mr. Self passed away -- A good teacher, especially for something like this, is a gift.

    Quote Originally Posted by gottabeoutdoors View Post
    Not quite NWI, but when my wife wanted to learn Sporting Clays back in 2013, we went down to Indiana Gun Club and she had a number of lessons with the pro there that does instruction. They also helped her find a shotgun that fit her perfectly and worked well for her (ended up being a Beretta A400). She got really decent in a short amount of time as a result of this arrangement and we had a lot of fun shooting various matches around the state.

    Hope that helps any.

    EDIT: I just saw where the instructor there at IGC, Bob Self, passed away earlier this year. He was a great teacher and seemingly a great person.

  5. #5
    Plinker

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    She's cleared for activity, was 3 years ago, and it wasn't the joint it self -- arm pit etc, but there was some associated nerve damage and her pectorals are still tender/sore from where they cut them. Prior to corona, she was back in the gym doing weight training etc so she's got full use.

    Quote Originally Posted by gregkl View Post
    I love shooting the clay's sports and I can see why anyone would want to.

    I do question: "pretty substantial surgery on her right shoulder"

    Is this a recent surgery that hopefully once recovered, she will be good to go?

    Or is it a chronic issue? If it's the latter, maybe shotgunning will not be a good idea long term. I hate to see someone not do an activity because of some limitation but I also like to see someone choose an activity that won't exacerbate a physical limitation. My brother had rotator cuff surgery and had to retire from water skiing. But he could still do archery and he can shoot some shotgun but sticks mostly to pistol these days.

    No matter what shotgun one shoots, you will deal with recoil. It would be a shame to have her cause more injury only to walk away from any kind of shooting activity.


  6. #6
    Grandmaster gregkl's Avatar

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    Quote Originally Posted by larcat View Post
    She's cleared for activity, was 3 years ago, and it wasn't the joint it self -- arm pit etc, but there was some associated nerve damage and her pectorals are still tender/sore from where they cut them. Prior to corona, she was back in the gym doing weight training etc so she's got full use.
    Okay, good to hear! My recommendation would be for a autoloader like you have already alluded to.

    There are two different systems out there that deal with the gas utilization. One has less perceived recoil than the other. Get the one with less.

    I'm not too up on which is which since I have been shooting my Beretta AL-2 Magnum since high school.
    Anything is possible

  7. #7
    Sharpshooter Limpy88's Avatar

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    When I have done shotgun instruction with a never shot person. Do the eye dominance exercise. I have found decent amount of females were left eye dominant. If she is, just have her shoot left handed. The arm issue wont be there and wont have to tape the glasses up to combat eye dominance.


    Learning to Shoot with your Weak Hand - Firearms Training
    Living over here in left field

  8. #8
    Grandmaster gregkl's Avatar

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    Quote Originally Posted by Limpy88 View Post
    When I have done shotgun instruction with a never shot person. Do the eye dominance exercise. I have found decent amount of females were left eye dominant. If she is, just have her shoot left handed. The arm issue wont be there and wont have to tape the glasses up to combat eye dominance.


    Learning to Shoot with your Weak Hand - Firearms Training
    I am amazed at people who can switch like that. I tried it. Being in my 6th decade of life, it wasn't going to happen.

    I just tape the left lens. I have a special pair of shooting glasses for shotgun sports.
    Anything is possible

  9. #9
    Sharpshooter Limpy88's Avatar

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    Quote Originally Posted by gregkl View Post
    I am amazed at people who can switch like that. I tried it. Being in my 6th decade of life, it wasn't going to happen.

    I just tape the left lens. I have a special pair of shooting glasses for shotgun sports.
    Have a buddy that was a 1000 yard black powder world champion. He had to switch in his 50's when he lost most sight in right eye. I met him after. I shot with every weekend for a year when he told me. I would have never have guessed it.
    Living over here in left field

  10. #10
    Master Twangbanger's Avatar

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    What do you shoot? Just have her shoot that (unless it's a Model 12...ouch). A strong 6-footer should be able to handle an 8-9 pound 12ga auto (20 gauges are good, too), but no sense buying something and setting up lessons until you know there is some basic interest. An hour or two spent on a skeet field should tell you that. Shoot some of the "easier" stations (1,7) with short leads. Surprises generate bad habits in beginners, so don't graduate to an oscillating trap until she's had a decent amount of experience shooting birds with known angles. As mentioned above, do check eye dominance. It could potentially affect whether you're looking for a RH or LH gun.

    Paid instructors are hard to find, but you may turn up some names at clubs where you shoot.


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