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  1. #11
    Expert Jeepster48439's Avatar

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    If you live near a LDS distribution center, they have a store that is open to the public where non-LDS can by beans, wheat, cocoa, potato flakes and other things in bulk.
    ďKeep your friends close and your enemies closer." -- SunTzu

  2. #12
    Expert Dorky_D's Avatar

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    Quote Originally Posted by woowoo2 View Post
    I don't put away food in storage.
    I store what we eat.

    Enlarge your pantry, rotate stocks, and store more of what your family eats.
    Working on this too! I am going to make an investment in some better shelving to rotate some mid-term storage foods. The stuff that does not last 10 years, but will last a year to 6 or so and we will rotate through that.
    Contact your elected officials. It takes a few seconds.
    http://www.capwiz.com/nra/dbq/officials/

  3. #13
    Plinker

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    Jeepster suggested LDS warehouse ...........................
    This is one of the best sources for a large variety of goods ........It is worth checking out.
    The one in Indy is located ..5151 W 84th St, Indianapolis, IN 46268 ( facility is located in a distribution warehouse park ) a little hard to find .
    Not open all the time . check hours on website . Good prices ......All they ask is for a small donation $$ for providing their service . Go on the tour of the place .
    They have a freezer that you can literally drive a semi into .

    https://providentliving.churchofjesu...s-map?lang=eng

  4. #14
    Grandmaster Leadeye's Avatar

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    Buy the canned stuff you like and rotate it. Most have a pretty good shelf life and it's easier to prepare.
    Where's the Kaboom? There was supposed to be an earth shattering Kaboom.

    Marvin the Martian

  5. #15
    Master Lex Concord's Avatar

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    +1 on oats

    You can get bulk honey (up to 5 gallon bucket - they ship, but you might want to drive down for that; it weighs 60 lbs) from Hunter's Honey Farm in Martinsville (https://www.huntershoneyfarm.com/)

    We've had good luck with items (including oats and beans) from Honeyville Farms (https://shop.honeyville.com/). They have good variety, both in style and size, good product, and good prices. They used to ship any size order for just $4.95

    I like Gamma Seal lids on my buckets; ymmv

    If you really want to get into wheat, and you're really hard core, you and a boatload of friends can organize a bulk shipment from Wheat Montana (https://www.wheatmontana.com/) We've never organized, but have participated. Be sure to have a place they can park a semi for a while.

    If you have electricity, you'll want to use it to turn your wheat berries into flour. If you're worried about utilities, check Lehman's for hand cranked or dual-power (hand crank w/ motor option) possibilities. Also, the NutriMill is an excellent countertop electric grain mill.

    Suggestion of the LDS Home Storage Center above is also a good one. I see stocknup has already provided details on that one.

    Finally, don't forget the bacon...if you get your timing right, you may be able to get an oz or two of gold for a can of this stuff
    https://www.amazon.com/Yoders-Fully-...0039LDMV6&th=1

    It's not thick-sliced applewood smoked, but your mouth will have no doubt it's bacon.

    Be sure to shop around for best pricing.
    Quote Originally Posted by Benjamin Franklin
    Rebellion to tyrants is obedience to God.
    Quote Originally Posted by Tench Coxe
    Congress have no power to disarm the militia. Their swords, and every other terrible implement of the soldier, are the birth-right of an American ... the unlimited power of the sword is not in the hands of either the federal or state governments, but, where I trust in God it will ever remain, in the hands of the people.
    Quote Originally Posted by William Blakstone
    It is better that ten guilty persons escape than that one innocent suffer.

  6. #16
    Master Lex Concord's Avatar

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    Quote Originally Posted by spencer rifle View Post
    This:
    https://www.amazon.com/Country-Livin.../dp/B003UNNE3E
    We have used one for years. With proper attachments, it can do wheat, corn, acorns, almost anything. Human powered, but can be motorized or even run by your bicycle. Basically indestructible.

    We sometimes order bulk from Walmart, but we have Amish stores nearby also.

    Bulk up on:
    Honey (never goes bad if it's the real thing)
    Sugar
    Instant coffee (I never drink it, but it will be in demand for trade)
    Jolly Ranchers
    Miso soup (lots of iodine, in case of radiation)
    Dried milk
    Apple cider vinegar

    We have saved up some Wise Foods dried stuff and regularly use it backpacking. We only get the dinners - the other meals are too expensive for what they are. The Stroganoff is great.
    That's a nice looking mill!

    Regarding things you don't use but might stash, I have some tobacco (I'm reformed, I tell you!), Nicorrette, and (my favorite) I found a good deal on plastic candy canes filled with airline sized bottles of liquor in an after-Christmas sale last year. One color had various flavors of schnapps, another various vodkas. Okay... I might use that.
    Quote Originally Posted by Benjamin Franklin
    Rebellion to tyrants is obedience to God.
    Quote Originally Posted by Tench Coxe
    Congress have no power to disarm the militia. Their swords, and every other terrible implement of the soldier, are the birth-right of an American ... the unlimited power of the sword is not in the hands of either the federal or state governments, but, where I trust in God it will ever remain, in the hands of the people.
    Quote Originally Posted by William Blakstone
    It is better that ten guilty persons escape than that one innocent suffer.

  7. #17
    Grandmaster Thor's Avatar

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    You can also find good mills at antique shops. We picked up a Star mill from 1885 at one, it does an outstanding job on just about anything you want to grind and is adjustable from course to fine and will take a #10 can in the hopper. (I tried to find a pick...I'll post one later if I do)
    Thor himself has spoken, mere mortals must make it so. - bradmedic04

  8. #18
    Expert

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    Quote Originally Posted by CampingJosh View Post
    You can get yeast out of the air. You'll just have to cultivate it a little bit... and then get used to the taste of whatever strain(s) you caught.
    Yeast is a booger!
    It's hard work to keep a strain pure.
    What you started out with 5 years ago isn't what you'll have today since it constantly picks up other yeast & mixes with them and it mutates depending on what you feed it. (Mitochondrial mutation, or so I've read)

    I started out with a specific baking brand of yeast, and after feeding it for about 5 years I started a new batch of the same type/brand, and the two were completely different.
    So I fingered the internet, ask a few questions and found out you can't keep a strain pure in your kitchen sticking your fingers in it and feeding it non-sterilized food media.

    So much for my big plans of having proper yeast forever...

    I find it REALLY hard to keep it dormant more than about a year without it dying, I don't know how they manage to seal up yeast in packages for years and it be active...
    But then again, I'm not a mycologist and don't have lab equipment.

    I did learn enough to NOT stick my fingers in the jar, and to bake the food media before I feed it...
    Even a blind pig finds an acorn once in a while!

  9. #19
    Expert

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    Spencer Rifle, does that mill have roller bearings?
    When I saw the parts/pieces I didn't see bearings listed.

    I'm mostly slip fit, metal on metal, but I have a can of food grade silicone grease and that keeps wear down pretty well if I don't hang a motor on them.
    I'm always looking to put roller bearings in this or that, but I never quite get around to machining on my hand crank tools... Just seems wrong somehow.

    I'm of the mindset that two is one, one is none.
    The meaning is, if it breaks, you are up a creek without a paddle.

    I settled on a specific size meat grinder/chopper, and picked up two or three with as many attachments as I could find.
    I even found the sausage stuffing attachments for them in stainless steel, I couldn't believe someone still made parts for them.
    (Not that I make my own sausage, but I do have the attachments! )

    The junk (spelled antique) stores have them cheap, flea markets, and if there is an antique farm equipment show with swap meet there will be several dozen if not hundreds.
    We go poke around the antique farm show every year, browse the swap meet (they only swap for cash) and look for something we don't have, and marvel at the old equipment that's still running.

    I picked out older grain mills and picked up 2 or 3 with attachments,
    And I purchased a couple from Eastern Europe and a couple from Mexico on eBay.
    The basic steel burr mills are dirt cheap, like $20 or $30 cheap.

    I also have juicers, peelers, coffee (hard bean) mills, and any of the other old, hand cranked stuff I ran onto for a reasonable price.
    It's a real accumulation, but we do use them, often motor driven at slow speed, but in a pinch the hand crank works just fine.
    I don't know how many I have, never counted, but it's quite a few. No more than they cost, why not?

    When my wife wants to make bread from white soft wheat (instead of hard red wheat) I'm more than happy to whip out a couple cups per load!
    Well worth the 20 minutes setting up & tearing down/cleaning to get bread from scratch!

    Do you guys have pictures of your hardware? Know when it was made, etc? I'd be interested in seeing what everyone has.

  10. #20
    Grandmaster

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    Over the past couple weeks, I've finally polished off the last of a case of MRE's that was 5ish years beyond expiration. When I first started eating them, I was pretty unhappy with them. Towards the end of the case I'd got used to MRE's enough that I could appreciate their worth. Still I want to do my own.

    It makes sense as a gardener/prepper sort to make use of what I do for sustenance and hobby to be expanded upon to put up foods in various fashion to be prepared and save at the grocery.
    -----------------------------------------------
    Done, done, and Iím on to the next one...
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