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  1. #81
    Expert NKBJ's Avatar

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    Late to thread...
    If you shop on line at the various computer manufacturers there are deals to be had.
    Also look at Fry's and other huge outlets. Last week got a awesome replacement for my soon to die work machine. The big brown truck dropped it on the front porch for under 300.

  2. #82
    Grandmaster IndyBeerman's Avatar

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    Quote Originally Posted by CHCRandy View Post
    You mind forwarding me the info on who you bought from in Avon? I may just have a unit built like I want it. Thank You!
    +

    Actually You might want to consider Fry's Electronics, had them build my current system 3 years ago because of two things, I hadn't built a system in over 5 years and was out of the loop on current specs, and they have almost absolutely everything possible in stock, plus it only cost 75.00 for the build and they installed Win10 and all drivers. Paid for it on a Friday afternoon and picked up Sunday upon opening.

    Termaltake Tower
    Corsair 900 watt power supply
    MSI 990FXA Gaming MB
    AMD FX 8350 core processor @ 4GHZ
    64gig of ram
    Nvidia 9600OC video card
    ASUS BluRay read/write
    1TB Patriot Ignite SSD
    Enermax liquid cooling double radiator w/twin 60mm fans
    2 120mm fans

    I also bought my monitor there, a 32inch LG 2ms gaming monitor
    Butthurt (*)......It happens a lot here on INGO, get over it if it happens to you.


    Trump reaffirms my decision everyday voting for him as President and my
    reason for voting for him again in 2020.



    Member#630, geez I've been here a while.

  3. #83
    Master Gabriel's Avatar

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jludo View Post

    This is a small pc, has space to add a larger ssd if you need more storage space but the guts of it are on an nvme m2 drive which is as fast as you can get.

    https://www.amazon.com/U55-Processor...top&th=1&psc=1
    This is interesting. I'm looking to upgrade my desktop which is over ten years old now. I would have never considered a mini PC like that, but I'd like to get rid of the computer desk and put it all on my regular desk with two monitors (one for movies/tv and one for a browser because I can't just sit and watch something with out thinking of a million things to look up). Beyond that I don't play games because the make me nauseous.

    How would one of these work? I'm prone to think buying the highest model will get me farther in the long run before it seems too old and slow, but I could be wrong about that.

    https://www.amazon.com/NUC7i5BNH-i5-...8YCVQGC9F&th=1
    Last edited by Gabriel; 4 Weeks Ago at 17:13.
    Medium speed. Moderate drag.

  4. #84
    Grandmaster

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    This brings up the old argument of whether to spend the big money up front on the CPU to attempt future proof your system or plan to load the system with up-gradable go fast stuff like RAM, SSD's and better WIFI?
    -----------------------------------------------
    Done, done, and Iím on to the next one...
    -----------------------------------------------

  5. #85
    Expert nonobaddog's Avatar

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    There is really nothing one can do to 'future-proof' a computer. The technology changes. Newer CPU's mean newer sockets and chipsets which means new motherboards and probably memory unless you are lucky and upgrade often. If you wait a while between upgrades pretty much everything will change.
    Power supplies might be compatible a little longer and optical drives as long as blu-ray is around.

    One might be better off selling the old computer whole instead of trying to cannibalize it for parts that are almost certainly going to be obsolete soon if not already.

    I just go with the best bang-for-the-buck and upgrade to a new build as needed. There are lots of websites with lots of opinions about the current hardware sweet-spots. Of course if you need the absolute best performance available you are kind of screwed for cost and upgrade schedule.

  6. #86
    Grandmaster Cameramonkey's Avatar

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    I disagree with Nono. You can futureproof somewhat, but it requires some upfront investment.

    14 years ago, I used to do a LOT of gaming. FPSs that required LOTS of CPU and expensive graphics cards. I "bought once, cried once" and bought the second fastest Core i7 CPU I could. (only because the difference between 3rd and second was 20% and 2nd and 1st was 120% increase in cost) Due to several factors (mainly changes to the games that turned me off if it) I quit gaming and just used the PC for surfing the web.

    I finally retired that PC last year because the motherboard finally died. It was still running strong even though I went from windows 7 to 10. Still cheaper than buying a new "good enough" PC every 3-4 years.

    Correction: I bought the PC 16 years ago. It was when Battlefield 1942 came out in 2002.
    Quote Originally Posted by Kirk Freeman View Post
    A confused cop is an arresty cop.
    Quote Originally Posted by hoosierdoc View Post
    also, where do we sign up to touch Frank's equipment?

  7. #87
    Expert nonobaddog's Avatar

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    I see your point and I agree somewhat. But a couple of things to add -

    - I wouldn't call the best bang-for-the-buck machine "good enough", you still want to get the "bang", typically they would be performance machines without paying for the last few steps where the prices go up fast. Kind of like you described - the last few steps are expensive but just under that level are the best performance-to-price ratios but still a serious performers - ie right now maybe an 8th or 9th generation i7 or i9 (I haven't done the homework recently) maybe even a 10th generation - I don't even know those prices.
    - 3-4 years is overstating the replacement schedule, I sure get more than that out of a new one.
    - Windows 10 is no more resource hungry than Windows 7, many people saw better performance in 10 than 7.
    - If you had kept gaming your machine probably would not have satisfied you that long.

  8. #88
    Master Jludo's Avatar

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gabriel View Post
    This is interesting. I'm looking to upgrade my desktop which is over ten years old now. I would have never considered a mini PC like that, but I'd like to get rid of the computer desk and put it all on my regular desk with two monitors (one for movies/tv and one for a browser because I can't just sit and watch something with out thinking of a million things to look up). Beyond that I don't play games because the make me nauseous.

    How would one of these work? I'm prone to think buying the highest model will get me farther in the long run before it seems too old and slow, but I could be wrong about that.

    https://www.amazon.com/NUC7i5BNH-i5-...8YCVQGC9F&th=1


    If you're just watching movies in 1080 and surfing the web, about any modern $300 pc will be fine for the foreseeable future. Adware/virus'/software issues are what plague most users before any sort of hardware failure/bottleneck. Especially now that most are m2 or solid state drives.

    Most any higher end computers, $600+, are overkill if you're not gaming or running gpu intensive applications like CAD or video editing.
    Last edited by Jludo; 4 Weeks Ago at 20:15.

  9. #89
    Grandmaster Cameramonkey's Avatar

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    Quote Originally Posted by nonobaddog View Post
    - If you had kept gaming your machine probably would not have satisfied you that long.
    Agreed. And I never meant to say it would have. My point is a gaming level rig today (without the high end video card) will work well as a general purpose rig 4x longer than a lower powered, "appropriately sized" system will.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jludo View Post

    Most any higher end computers, $600+, are overkill if you're not gaming or running gpu intensive applications like CAD or video editing.
    Its only overkill for the first half or so of its longer than normal life. Then when it has the power of a future entry level PC it will still function acceptably well.


    So lets look into the future. Assuming in the future a general purpose PC will have a performance rating of 500 MonkeyUnits. That will do what needs to be done at an acceptable level for general computing. If you wanted to play games in the future you would need a PC rated at 1,000 MonkeyUnits. However from that vantage point looking back into the past, today's entry level system would rate at only 50-100 MonkeyUnits, far slower than required to do a good job running that latest 3D AI powered word processor and predictive internet browser of the future. But That gaming rig of the past (today) actually scored at 400 MonkeyUnits. That older system wouldnt be able to play the games, but it would still hold its own running internet apps and word processors.

    And not only do you have the pain of buying repeated computers over that 10-15 year life span, you have the headaches of moving all the data to the new PC, resetting the settings the way you like repeatedly, etc.

    But, some people wont be able to swallow that higher cost up front, so they will just end up buying PCs more frequently. And that's OK.
    Quote Originally Posted by Kirk Freeman View Post
    A confused cop is an arresty cop.
    Quote Originally Posted by hoosierdoc View Post
    also, where do we sign up to touch Frank's equipment?

  10. #90
    Expert nonobaddog's Avatar

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    For a gaming system you need most of your MonkeyUnits in the GPU.
    For load testing developed applications and databases you need the CPU.


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