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  1. #41
    rvb
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    Grandmaster rvb's Avatar
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    I suspect you know the answer. You know the theory behind the techniques. Now it'll take that P word you hate.
    Changing gun types changes our index, our NPA. If you aren't REALLY watching the sights as the shot breaks, you'll revert to your index (the "muscle memory" piece of our grip). glocks tend to point high for most people, so it's not unreasonable to think that in comparison, the sig will point a little lower. watch those sites!

    I remember when I first started shooting glocks in production... oh so many people asked whether I struggled with the grip angle and the gun naturally pointing high. I was kind of surprised, because no, I never noticed it. I drove the sites, vs relying on index. so I tried some eyes-closed dryfire draws, and sure enough, it was pointing high...

    -rvb
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  2. #42
    Somewhat Purple-ish rhino's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rvb View Post
    I suspect you know the answer. You know the theory behind the techniques. Now it'll take that P word you hate.
    Changing gun types changes our index, our NPA. If you aren't REALLY watching the sights as the shot breaks, you'll revert to your index (the "muscle memory" piece of our grip). glocks tend to point high for most people, so it's not unreasonable to think that in comparison, the sig will point a little lower. watch those sites!

    I remember when I first started shooting glocks in production... oh so many people asked whether I struggled with the grip angle and the gun naturally pointing high. I was kind of surprised, because no, I never noticed it. I drove the sites, vs relying on index. so I tried some eyes-closed dryfire draws, and sure enough, it was pointing high...

    -rvb
    I'm leaning that direction, but I shot some groups last Friday and it was happening when I was purposely watching the front sight lift and settle. The low hits with the Sig weren't as bad, but the high hits with the 1911 was.



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  3. #43
    Somewhat Purple-ish rhino's Avatar
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    My random youtubing led me to this gem about trigger control (and the importance of grip). I've heard of the company, but I was not previously familiar with the teacher in the video. I recommend watching!



    Here is the same guy talking about grip. I haven't reviewed these yet, but since his message in the trigger control video leads to grip, I thought I would include them here:





    "The people shall have a right to bear arms, for the defense of themselves and the State."
    INDIANA CONSTITUTION
    Article 1 - Bill of Rights - Section 32

    ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ

    To prevail you must ACT!

  4. #44
    Master cedartop's Avatar
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    I have actually learned a lot from Aron's videos lately, especially his low light stuff. I may try to train with him this year. The downside is I have been very tempted to buy an Agency Arms Glock.
    Michael Swisher

  5. #45
    Somewhat Purple-ish rhino's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cedartop View Post
    I have actually learned a lot from Aron's videos lately, especially his low light stuff. I may try to train with him this year. The downside is I have been very tempted to buy an Agency Arms Glock.
    He is clearly very good at articulating his thoughts. I think training with him would be a very good experience.

    Plus, you won't have to bite your tongue and endure the "grip doesn't matter" nonsense because he won't be saying it!



    "The people shall have a right to bear arms, for the defense of themselves and the State."
    INDIANA CONSTITUTION
    Article 1 - Bill of Rights - Section 32

    ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ

    To prevail you must ACT!

  6. #46
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    Do you think he mis-spoke on the 60-40 comment or he is/was actually meaning to do 60% with the gun hand? I like his overall attitude about grip.

    His trigger reset anticipation technique seems like a method for slapping the trigger well, which is a good thing but I don't see it as that different or revolutionary. He is well spoken and bring plenty to the table to think about.

    I have not watched the third one yet. The 39 minutes was too much for the time I had available.

    I also like the idea of a few dry fire draws with the clothes you are wearing that morning.
    No one is stronger or more dangerous than the man who can harness his emotions.

    www.BrightFirearmsTraining.com

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  7. #47
    Master cedartop's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coach View Post
    Do you think he mis-spoke on the 60-40 comment or he is/was actually meaning to do 60% with the gun hand? I like his overall attitude about grip.

    Odd, the first couple times I watched it, my mind just applied it the other way because that is what I used to hear a lot, 60/40 in favor of support hand. Not sure which way he meant.

    His trigger reset anticipation technique seems like a method for slapping the trigger well, which is a good thing but I don't see it as that different or revolutionary. He is well spoken and bring plenty to the table to think about.

    Though he explains it a bit differently, I first heard of not using the reset from Ernest Langdon and have since adopted it, though I actually used to teach it the pin the trigger through recoil then reset way. It way not seem a lot different in theory, but in practice I think it is.

    I have not watched the third one yet. The 39 minutes was too much for the time I had available.

    I also like the idea of a few dry fire draws with the clothes you are wearing that morning.
    My responses in bold.
    Michael Swisher

  8. #48
    Somewhat Purple-ish rhino's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coach View Post
    Do you think he mis-spoke on the 60-40 comment or he is/was actually meaning to do 60% with the gun hand? I like his overall attitude about grip.

    His trigger reset anticipation technique seems like a method for slapping the trigger well, which is a good thing but I don't see it as that different or revolutionary. He is well spoken and bring plenty to the table to think about.

    I have not watched the third one yet. The 39 minutes was too much for the time I had available.

    I also like the idea of a few dry fire draws with the clothes you are wearing that morning.
    I'll have to go back and listen again. Like cedartop, I think I heard what I was expecting to hear.



    "The people shall have a right to bear arms, for the defense of themselves and the State."
    INDIANA CONSTITUTION
    Article 1 - Bill of Rights - Section 32

    ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ

    To prevail you must ACT!

  9. #49
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    I think the new shooters should ride the reset until they can do that successfully. Then set to work about being able to slap the trigger well. If you watch new shooters going to work slapping the trigger is too soft a word for what many of them do. Stopping the trigger finger at the right spot is advanced work. Getting the newer person to slap the trigger well is like teaching bike tricks before taking the training wheels off.

    Once someone has the fundamentals under control slapping the trigger has it place and time.
    No one is stronger or more dangerous than the man who can harness his emotions.

    www.BrightFirearmsTraining.com

    abright@ccrtc.com


  10. #50
    Master cedartop's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coach View Post
    I think the new shooters should ride the reset until they can do that successfully. Then set to work about being able to slap the trigger well. If you watch new shooters going to work slapping the trigger is too soft a word for what many of them do. Stopping the trigger finger at the right spot is advanced work. Getting the newer person to slap the trigger well is like teaching bike tricks before taking the training wheels off.

    Once someone has the fundamentals under control slapping the trigger has it place and time.
    That is why I mentioned they explain it differently. Ernest definitely doesn't call it slapping the trigger, and really it isn't. As Ernest explains it, and I have witnessed, unfortunately when you teach people to pin the trigger to the rear and then let it out after recoil recovery, they tend to use the reset as the gas pedal, no the sights.




    Michael Swisher

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